Increased plant volatile production affects oviposition, but not larval development, in the moth Helicoverpa armigera

McCallum, Emily J., Cunningham, John Paul, Lücker, Joost, Zalucki, Myron P., De Voss, James J . and Botella, José R. (2011) Increased plant volatile production affects oviposition, but not larval development, in the moth Helicoverpa armigera. Journal of Experimental Biology, 214 21: 3672-3677. doi:10.1242/jeb.059923

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Author McCallum, Emily J.
Cunningham, John Paul
Lücker, Joost
Zalucki, Myron P.
De Voss, James J .
Botella, José R.
Title Increased plant volatile production affects oviposition, but not larval development, in the moth Helicoverpa armigera
Formatted title
Increased plant volatile production affects oviposition, but not larval development, in the moth Helicoverpa armigera
Journal name Journal of Experimental Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0949
1477-9145
Publication date 2011-11-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1242/jeb.059923
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 214
Issue 21
Start page 3672
End page 3677
Total pages 6
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher The Company of Biologists
Language eng
Abstract It is well established that herbivorous insects respond to changes in plant odour production, but little attention has been given to whether these responses relate to direct fitness costs of plant volatile production on insect growth and survival. Here, we use transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants that produce relatively large amounts of the volatile (S)-linalool to study whether the responses of egg-laying herbivorous insects to linalool production relate directly to the growth and survival of offspring. In choice tests, fewer eggs were laid on transgenic plants compared with non-transformed controls, indicating that increased linalool emissions have a deterrent effect on Helicoverpa armigera oviposition. Larval survival and larval mass after feeding on transgenic leaves, however, was comparable to non-transformed controls. (S)-linalool, whether in volatile or sequestered form, does not appear to have a direct effect on offspring fitness in this moth. We discuss how the ecology of this polyphagous moth species may necessitate a high tolerance for certain volatiles and their related non-volatile compounds, and suggest that responses by adult female H. armigera moths towards increased linalool production may be context specific and relate to other indirect effects on fitness.
Formatted abstract
It is well established that herbivorous insects respond to changes in plant odour production, but little attention has been given to
whether these responses relate to direct fitness costs of plant volatile production on insect growth and survival. Here, we use
transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants that produce relatively large amounts of the volatile (S)-linalool to study whether
the responses of egg-laying herbivorous insects to linalool production relate directly to the growth and survival of offspring. In
choice tests, fewer eggs were laid on transgenic plants compared with non-transformed controls, indicating that increased
linalool emissions have a deterrent effect on Helicoverpa armigera oviposition. Larval survival and larval mass after feeding on
transgenic leaves, however, was comparable to non-transformed controls. (S)-linalool, whether in volatile or sequestered form,
does not appear to have a direct effect on offspring fitness in this moth. We discuss how the ecology of this polyphagous moth
species may necessitate a high tolerance for certain volatiles and their related non-volatile compounds, and suggest that
responses by adult female H. armigera moths towards increased linalool production may be context specific and relate to other
indirect effects on fitness.
Keyword Helicoverpa armigera
Nicotiana tabacum
Linalool
Olfaction
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP0988150
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Tue, 18 Oct 2011, 20:01:06 EST by Dr James De Voss on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences