The association between delusional-like experiences and suicidal thoughts and behaviour

Saha, Sukanta, Scott, James G., Johnston, Amy K., Slade, Tim N., Varghese, Daniel, Carter, Gregory and McGrath, John J. (2011) The association between delusional-like experiences and suicidal thoughts and behaviour. Schizophrenia Research, 132 2-3: 197-202. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2011.07.012


Author Saha, Sukanta
Scott, James G.
Johnston, Amy K.
Slade, Tim N.
Varghese, Daniel
Carter, Gregory
McGrath, John J.
Title The association between delusional-like experiences and suicidal thoughts and behaviour
Journal name Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0920-9964
1573-2509
Publication date 2011-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.schres.2011.07.012
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 132
Issue 2-3
Start page 197
End page 202
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:
Delusional-like experiences (DLEs) are common in the general population. Whilst it is well known that psychotic disorders increase the risk of suicide, it is unclear if DLEs are also associated with suicidal thoughts and behaviour. This study aims to explore these variables in a large population-based sample.

Method:
Participants were drawn from a national survey of mental health (n = 8841) in Australia. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to identify DLEs, psychiatric disorders, and information related to suicidal ideation, suicide plan and suicide attempts. We examined the relationship between DLEs and suicidal ideation, plans and attempts using logistic regression, adjusted for a range of potentially confounding variables.

Results:
8.4% of subjects endorsed one or more DLEs. 12.9% subjects reported suicidal ideation, 3.8% suicidal plans, and 3.0% a suicide attempt at some point in their lives. Those with any DLE were about two to four times as likely to report suicidal ideation, plans or attempts. There was a dose response relationship between DLEs and endorsement of suicide-related items.

Conclusions:
DLEs are common in the general population and appear to be independently associated with suicidal thoughts and behaviour. DLE may provide a marker of vulnerability to suicide, and thus could be of value in future suicide prevention research.
Keyword Suicide
Suicidal behaviours
Delusional-like experiences
Epidemiology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 17 Oct 2011, 23:18:05 EST by Sheila Cleary on behalf of Psychiatry - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital