Mouthing off about fish capture: Jaw movement in pinnipeds reveals the real secrets of ingestion

Liebsch, N., Wilson, R. P., Bornemann, H., Adelung, D. and Ploetz, J. (2007). Mouthing off about fish capture: Jaw movement in pinnipeds reveals the real secrets of ingestion. In: Martin Biuw, Sascha K. Hooker, Bernie J. McConnell, Patrick J.O. Miller and Carol E. Sparling, Proceedings of the 2005 International Symposium on Bio-logging Science: Logging and relaying physical and biological data using animal-attached tags. Second International Symposium on Bio-logging Science, St Andrews, Scotland, United Kingdom, (256-269). 13-16 June 2005. doi:10.1016/j.dsr2.2006.11.014


Author Liebsch, N.
Wilson, R. P.
Bornemann, H.
Adelung, D.
Ploetz, J.
Title of paper Mouthing off about fish capture: Jaw movement in pinnipeds reveals the real secrets of ingestion
Conference name Second International Symposium on Bio-logging Science
Conference location St Andrews, Scotland, United Kingdom
Conference dates 13-16 June 2005
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 2005 International Symposium on Bio-logging Science: Logging and relaying physical and biological data using animal-attached tags   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Deep-Sea Research Part 2: Topical Studies in Oceanography   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Publication Year 2007
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1016/j.dsr2.2006.11.014
ISSN 0967-0645
Editor Martin Biuw
Sascha K. Hooker
Bernie J. McConnell
Patrick J.O. Miller
Carol E. Sparling
Volume 54
Issue 3-4
Start page 256
End page 269
Total pages 14
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Determination of when and where animals feed and how much they consume is fundamental to understand their ecology and role in ecosystems. However, the lack of reliable data on feeding habits of wild animals, and particularly in marine endotherms, attests to the difficulty in doing this. A promising recent development proposes using a Hall sensor-magnet system, the inter-mandibular angle sensor (IMASEN) attached to animals’ jaws to elucidate feeding events. We conducted trials on captive pinnipeds by feeding IMASEN-equipped animals with prey to examine the utility of this system. Most feeding events were clearly distinguishable from other jaw movements; only small prey items might not be resolved adequately. Based on the results of this study we examined feeding events from free-ranging pinnipeds fitted with IMASENs and dead-reckoners and present data on prey capture and ingestion in relation to the three-dimensional movement patterns of the seals.
Keyword Feeding
Technology
Ecology
Harbour seals
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
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Created: Mon, 17 Oct 2011, 18:48:23 EST by Nikolai Liebsch on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute