Longitudinal change in diet quality in Australian adults varies by demographic, socio-economic, and lifestyle characteristics

Arabshahi, Simin, Lahmann, Petra H., Williams, Gail M., Marks, Geoffrey C. and van der Pols, Jolieke C. (2011) Longitudinal change in diet quality in Australian adults varies by demographic, socio-economic, and lifestyle characteristics. Journal of Nutrition, 141 10: 1871-1879. doi:10.3945/jn.111.140822

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Arabshahi, Simin
Lahmann, Petra H.
Williams, Gail M.
Marks, Geoffrey C.
van der Pols, Jolieke C.
Title Longitudinal change in diet quality in Australian adults varies by demographic, socio-economic, and lifestyle characteristics
Journal name Journal of Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3166
1541-6100
Publication date 2011-10-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3945/jn.111.140822
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 141
Issue 10
Start page 1871
End page 1879
Total pages 9
Place of publication Bethesda, MD, United States
Publisher American Society for Nutrition
Language eng
Abstract Knowledge of determinants of change in diet quality is needed, but it is relatively limited to date and mostly available from cross-sectional studies. We investigated longitudinal change in diet quality and its associations with period of birth (birth cohort) and socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics. We used dietary intake data collected by FFQ in 1992, 1996, and 2007 from a population-based random sample of adults comprising 1511 men and women aged 25–75 y at baseline and applied generalized estimating equations to examine determinants of long-term change in diet quality, calculated using a diet quality index reflecting dietary guidelines for Australian adults. information on socio-demographic and lifestyle factors was derived from self-reported questionnaires. Multivariable models, stratified by sex, were adjusted for confounders. We showed that there was an overall increase in diet quality in both men and women, but scores related to intake of fruit (men only), cereals, and food variety decreased during a 15-y follow-up. Younger age, higher occupational level (men only), and low to medium level of physical activity and hormone replacement therapy use in women were independently associated with greater improvement in diet quality over time (P , 0.05). In conclusion, despite an overall improvement in diet quality over time, this study suggests that efforts to further improve diet quality in Australia should focus on increasing consumption of fruit, cereals, and a greater variety of foods. More evidence from studies that assess change in dietary quality in longitudinal studies is needed to corroborate these findings.
Keyword Hormone Replacement Therapy
Food Frequency Questionnaire
Coronary Heart Disease
Personal Characteristics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 16 Oct 2011, 10:06:09 EST by System User on behalf of School of Public Health