Productive tension: Force-sensing and homeostasis of cell-cell junctions

Gomez, Guillermo A., McLachlan, Robert W. and Yap, Alpha S. (2011) Productive tension: Force-sensing and homeostasis of cell-cell junctions. Trends in Cell Biology, 21 9: 499-505. doi:10.1016/j.tcb.2011.05.006


Author Gomez, Guillermo A.
McLachlan, Robert W.
Yap, Alpha S.
Title Productive tension: Force-sensing and homeostasis of cell-cell junctions
Journal name Trends in Cell Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8924
1879-3088
Publication date 2011-09-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.tcb.2011.05.006
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 21
Issue 9
Start page 499
End page 505
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 1307 Cell Biology
Abstract Cell-cell contacts are major determinants of tissue organization in both health and disease. Adhesive interactions, especially those mediated by classical cadherin receptors, influence cell-cell recognition and tissue patterning during development. Conversely, cadherin dysfunction promotes tumor progression to invasion and metastasis. Over the past three decades, we have learnt a great deal about the molecular mechanisms responsible for cadherin-based cell-cell interactions. Yet our knowledge remains incomplete. The intersection between cell biology and mechanical forces has long been suspected to be an important missing factor in understanding cadherin biology. However, tangible evidence remained elusive until recently, when several reports began to elucidate the role of cadherins and the cytoskeleton in mechanotransduction. In this review, we examine these advances and discuss their implications.
Formatted abstract
Cell–cell contacts are major determinants of tissue organization in both health and disease. Adhesive interactions, especially those mediated by classical cadherin receptors, influence cell–cell recognition and tissue patterning during development. Conversely, cadherin dysfunction promotes tumor progression to invasion and metastasis. Over the past three decades, we have learnt a great deal about the molecular mechanisms responsible for cadherin-based cell–cell interactions. Yet our knowledge remains incomplete. The intersection between cell biology and mechanical forces has long been suspected to be an important missing factor in understanding cadherin biology. However, tangible evidence remained elusive until recently, when several reports began to elucidate the role of cadherins and the cytoskeleton in mechanotransduction. In this review, we examine these advances and discuss their implications.
Keyword Cadherin-adhesive contacts
Epithelial-cells
alpha-Catenin
Myosin-VI
Caenorhabditis-Elegans
Apical constriction
Adherens junctions
Vinculin
Actin
Complex
α-Catenin
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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