Dryland salinity and vector-borne disease emergence in southwestern Australia

Jardine, Andrew, Corkeron, Maree and Weinstein, Philip (2011) Dryland salinity and vector-borne disease emergence in southwestern Australia. Environmental Geochemistry and Health, 33 4: 363-370. doi:10.1007/s10653-011-9387-1


Author Jardine, Andrew
Corkeron, Maree
Weinstein, Philip
Title Dryland salinity and vector-borne disease emergence in southwestern Australia
Journal name Environmental Geochemistry and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-4042
1573-2983
Publication date 2011-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-011-9387-1
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 33
Issue 4
Start page 363
End page 370
Total pages 8
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract Broad-scale clearing of native vegetation for agriculture in southwestern Australia has resulted in severe ecosystem degradation, which has been compounded by the subsequent development of large areas of dryland salinity; decreased transevaporation allows the water table to rise, dissolving ancient aeolian salt deposits and creating saline surface pools. The mosquito-borne disease Ross River virus has been noted as a potential adverse human health outcome in salinity-affected regions because the principal vector, Aedes camptorhynchus, is salt tolerant and thrives preferentially in such systems. To understand the geology and ecology underlying the relationship between land clearing and disease emergence, we examine the relationship between dryland salinity processes that determine the dissolved solids profile of saline pools in affected areas, the mosquito vectors and interactions with the human population within the disease cycle. Aedes camptorhynchus is able to survive in a wide range of salinities in pools created by dryland salinity processes. The link with disease emergence is achieved where population distribution and activity overlaps with the convergence of environmental and ecological conditions that enhance disease transmission.
Formatted abstract
Broad-scale clearing of native vegetation for agriculture in southwestern Australia has resulted in severe ecosystem degradation, which has been compounded by the subsequent development of large areas of dryland salinity; decreased transevaporation allows the water table to rise, dissolving ancient aeolian salt deposits and creating saline surface pools. The mosquito-borne disease Ross River virus has been noted as a potential adverse human health outcome in salinity-affected regions because the principal vector, Aedes camptorhynchus, is salt tolerant and thrives preferentially in such systems. To understand the geology and ecology underlying the relationship between land clearing and disease emergence, we examine the relationship between dryland salinity processes that determine the dissolved solids profile of saline pools in affected areas, the mosquito vectors and interactions with the human population within the disease cycle. Aedes camptorhynchus is able to survive in a wide range of salinities in pools created by dryland salinity processes. The link with disease emergence is achieved where population distribution and activity overlaps with the convergence of environmental and ecological conditions that enhance disease transmission.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 14 Oct 2011, 01:11:40 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health