Venoms as a platform for human drugs: Translating toxins into therapeutics

King, Glenn F. (2011) Venoms as a platform for human drugs: Translating toxins into therapeutics. Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy, 11 11: 1469-1484. doi:10.1517/14712598.2011.621940


Author King, Glenn F.
Title Venoms as a platform for human drugs: Translating toxins into therapeutics
Journal name Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1744-7682
1471-2598
Publication date 2011-11-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1517/14712598.2011.621940
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 11
Issue 11
Start page 1469
End page 1484
Total pages 16
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Language eng
Abstract Introduction: An extraordinarily diverse range of animals have evolved venoms for predation, defence, or competitor deterrence. The major components of most venoms are peptides and proteins that are often protease-resistant due to their disulfide-rich architectures. Some of these toxins have become valuable as pharmacological tools and/or therapeutics due to their extremely high specificity and potency for particular molecular targets. There are currently six FDA-approved drugs derived from venom peptides or proteins.
Formatted abstract
Introduction: An extraordinarily diverse range of animals have evolved venoms for predation, defence, or competitor deterrence. The major components of most venoms are peptides and proteins that are often protease-resistant due to their disulfide-rich architectures. Some of these toxins have become valuable as pharmacological tools and/or therapeutics due to their extremely high specificity and potency for particular molecular targets. There are currently six FDA-approved drugs derived from venom peptides or proteins.

Areas covered: This article surveys the current pipeline of venom-derived therapeutics and critically examines the potential of peptide and protein drugs derived from venoms. Emerging trends are identified, including an increasing industry focus on disulfide-rich venom peptides and the use of a broader array of molecular targets in order to develop venom-based therapeutics for treating a wider range of clinical conditions.

Expert opinion:
Key technical advances in combination with a renewed industry-wide focus on biologics have converged to provide a larger than ever pipeline of venom-derived therapeutics. Disulfide-rich venom peptides obviate some of the traditional disadvantages of therapeutic peptides and some may be suitable for oral administration. Moreover, some venom peptides can breach the blood brain barrier and translocate across cell membranes, which opens up the possibility of exploiting molecular targets not previously accessible to peptide drugs.
Keyword Biologic
Disulfide bond
Drug
Peptide
Therapeutic
Venom
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP110103129
APP1012338
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 198 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 199 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sat, 08 Oct 2011, 00:07:17 EST by Professor Glenn King on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences