Young adult problem behaviour outcomes of adolescent bullying

McGee, Tara Renae, Scott, James G., McGrath, John J., Williams, Gail M., O'Callaghan, Michael, Bor, William and Najman, Jake M. (2011) Young adult problem behaviour outcomes of adolescent bullying. Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, 3 2: 110-114. doi:10.1108/17596591111132936

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ254425_fulltext.pdf UQ254425_fulltext.pdf application/pdf 4.14MB 0
UQ254425_other.pdf UQ254425_other.pdf application/pdf 6.68KB 0

Author McGee, Tara Renae
Scott, James G.
McGrath, John J.
Williams, Gail M.
O'Callaghan, Michael
Bor, William
Najman, Jake M.
Title Young adult problem behaviour outcomes of adolescent bullying
Journal name Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1759-6599
2042-8715
Publication date 2011-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1108/17596591111132936
Volume 3
Issue 2
Start page 110
End page 114
Total pages 5
Place of publication Hove, United Kingdom
Publisher Pier Professional
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to report on the association between bullying victimisation and various internalizing and externalizing behaviours including anxiety and depression, somatic problems, withdrawn behaviour, aggressive and delinquent behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach
- Data for this research come from the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy and its Outcomes (MUSP) a prospective cohort study of mothers and their children which began in Brisbane in 1981, assessing the impact of experiences of being bullied at 14 years of age and YASR outcomes at 21 years of age. Brisbane is the capital city of the State of Queensland, Australia. The site for the research was the Brisbane Mater Misericordiae Mothers' Hospital (MMH), which is one of the two major obstetric units in Brisbane. In effect all pregnant women attending a publicly-funded obstetrical service over a three-year period were recruited to the study (about 50 percent of women attend public obstetrical services in Queensland). Findings - The authors find that: first, there is no association between the experience of being bullied and young adult anxiety and depression, as well as some other outcomes (withdrawn, intrusive behaviour); second, for both males and females, there are increased rates of attention problems for those children who have been bullied; and third, males and females respond somewhat differently to being bullied, with males reporting more aggressive behaviour and females reporting more somatic problems.

Findings
- The authors find that: first, there is no association between the experience of being bullied and young adult anxiety and depression, as well as some other outcomes (withdrawn, intrusive behaviour); second, for both males and females, there are incrased rates of attention problems for those children who have been bullied; and third, males and females respod somewhat differently to being bullied, with males reporting more aggressive behaviour and females reporting more somatic problems.

Originality/value - Overall, the findings suggest that the likely impact of being bullied may not be widespread across mental health domains, and that the impact may differ somewhat depending upon whether the person bullied is a male or female.
Keyword Bullying
Australia
Children
Schools
Adolescents
Developmental psychology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 07 Oct 2011, 22:50:22 EST by Sheila Cleary on behalf of Psychiatry - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital