A taste for place: The cultivation of an audience for climate-responsive architecture in Queensland

Stead, Naomi, van der Plaat, Deborah and Macathur, John (2011). A taste for place: The cultivation of an audience for climate-responsive architecture in Queensland. In: Antony Moulis and Deborah van der Plaat, Audience: The 28th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference. Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, Brisbane, Australia, (1-15). 7-10 July 2011.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ253972_fulltext.pdf HERDC evidence - not publicly available application/pdf 200.46KB 0
Author Stead, Naomi
van der Plaat, Deborah
Macathur, John
Title of paper A taste for place: The cultivation of an audience for climate-responsive architecture in Queensland
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 7-10 July 2011
Convener Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ)
Proceedings title Audience: The 28th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Place of Publication Brisbane, Australia
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ)
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780646558264
0646558269
Editor Antony Moulis
Deborah van der Plaat
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The architecture in Queensland, uniquely in Australia, has long been understood in terms of climate. Historically seen as a solution to the problem of heat, local buildings have been framed (by the present day historian rather than the nineteenth-century architect) in terms of site-specific technical amelioration rather than art. In the present day however, this situation has reversed: the local climate is now highly valued in terms of lifestyle and cultural capital, with a corresponding rise in the taste for and perceived artistic value of ‘regionalist’ architecture. Documenting the shifting values attached to ideas of climate and art in both the late-nineteenth and early twenty-first centuries, and architecture’s often changing relationship to these, the paper seeks to demonstrate not only the limitations of such climate-centric readings but the cultural logic that often underpins them. Two comparative ‘flagship’ projects, GHM Addison’s New Exhibition Building of 1891, commissioned by the Queensland National Agricultural and Industrial Association; and the Queensland Art Gallery’s Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) project, completed in late 2006, will provide the focus for this discussion. Examining the institutional framing of climate, art and industry in each building, the paper argues for the need to understand the regional-specificity of Queensland architecture as a matter of public policy, a state attempt to train an audience and taste for architecture in and of Queensland. Considering these issues, the paper outlines the ambitions, scope and methods of a newly-funded ARC Discovery research project, ‘The Cultural Logic of Queensland Architecture: Place, Taste, and Economy.’
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 03 Oct 2011, 13:52:44 EST by Deborah van der Plaat on behalf of School of Architecture