The role of the Constitution in major social conflicts

Gelber, Katharine (2011). The role of the Constitution in major social conflicts. In Jurgen Brohmer (Ed.), The German Constitution Turns 60 : Basic Law and Commonwealth Constitution, German and Australian Perspectives (pp. 129-144) Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Peter Lang Publishing.

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Author Gelber, Katharine
Title of chapter The role of the Constitution in major social conflicts
Title of book The German Constitution Turns 60 : Basic Law and Commonwealth Constitution, German and Australian Perspectives
Place of Publication Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Publisher Peter Lang Publishing
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Series Öffentliches und Internationales Recht
ISBN 9783631602485
Editor Jurgen Brohmer
Volume number 13
Chapter number 8
Start page 129
End page 144
Total pages 16
Total chapters 13
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The 60th anniversary of the German Constitution provided the backdrop for a Conference at the Australian National University on 22nd and 23rd May 2009, bringing together Australian and German constitutional scholars to discuss core features of the constitutions of both countries. The following issues were presented and discussed from an Australian and German perspective respectively: Federalism as both countries are organized as federations; the concept of human dignity which is a central pillar in the German constitutional and legal system but not mentioned in the Commonwealth Constitution at all; international cooperation and integration as a challenge for any constitutional system in the globalised world; the German Basic Law and the Australian Commonwealth Constitution and their important roles in resolving major social conflicts in both societies, the relationship between the various branches of government as a core issue for both constitutional systems, and the concept of free speech or, broader, the freedom of communication as the central and fundamental right and core prerequisite for any democratic system and the history of the Basic Law. [from publisher's website]
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 22 Sep 2011, 10:26:35 EST by Dr Katharine Gelber on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies