Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using N-doped Ba(5)Ta(4)O(15) under solar irradiation

Mukherji, Aniruddh, Sun, Chenghua, Smith, Sean C, Lu, Gao Qing and Wang, Lianzhou (2011) Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using N-doped Ba(5)Ta(4)O(15) under solar irradiation. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 115 31: 15674-15678. doi:10.1021/jp202783t


Author Mukherji, Aniruddh
Sun, Chenghua
Smith, Sean C
Lu, Gao Qing
Wang, Lianzhou
Title Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using N-doped Ba(5)Ta(4)O(15) under solar irradiation
Formatted title
Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using N-doped Ba5Ta4O15 under solar irradiation
Journal name Journal of Physical Chemistry C   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-7447
1932-7455
Publication date 2011-08-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1021/jp202783t
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 115
Issue 31
Start page 15674
End page 15678
Total pages 5
Place of publication Washington, DC, U.S.A.
Publisher American Chemical Society
Language eng
Abstract Solar light induced water splitting on photocatalysts is a very important area of research. Anion doping of photocatalysts normally active only under ultraviolet (UV) light has been reported to be a possible way of increasing visible light photocatalytic performance. Here we report a (111) layered perovskite material Ba5Ta4O15 that was doped with nitrogen. The resulting Ba5Ta4O15-xNx compound exhibited an extraordinary increase in visible light absorbance. The uniform distribution of the nitrogen dopant was attributed to the unique layered (111) structure, which provides intergallery spacings between the perovskite layers for the dopant to diffuse easily in the compound particles during the doping process. It was further verified by density of states that the N 2p states mixed with pre-existing 0 2,p states that moved the valence band maximum upward without effecting the conduction band, which was composed of the Ta 4d orbital. The doped photocatalysts exhibited not only increased visible light absorbance but increased photocatalytic hydrogen production of similar to 50% under simulated solar irradiation, in comparison to that of undoped parent compound.
Formatted abstract
Solar light induced water splitting on photocatalysts is a very important area of research. Anion doping of photocatalysts normally active only under ultraviolet (UV) light has been reported to be a possible way of increasing visible light photocatalytic performance. Here we report a (111) layered perovskite material Ba5Ta4O15 that was doped with nitrogen. The resulting Ba5Ta4O15−Nx compound exhibited an extraordinary increase in visible light absorbance. The uniform distribution of the nitrogen dopant was attributed to the unique layered (111) structure, which provides intergallery spacings between the perovskite layers for the dopant to diffuse easily in the compound particles during the doping process. It was further verified by density of states that the N 2p states mixed with pre-existing O 2p states that moved the valence band maximum upward without effecting the conduction band, which was composed of the Ta 4d orbital. The doped photocatalysts exhibited not only increased visible light absorbance but increased photocatalytic hydrogen production of ~50% under simulated solar irradiation, in comparison to that of undoped parent compound.
Keyword Visible-light irradiation
TiO2
Catalysts
O-2
H-2
O2
H2
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 21 Sep 2011, 01:14:40 EST by Dr Chenghua Sun on behalf of Aust Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology