Fall risk: the clinical relevance of falls and how to integrate fall risk with fracture risk

Peeters, G.M.E.E. (Geeske), van Schoor, Natasja M. and Lips, Paul (2009) Fall risk: the clinical relevance of falls and how to integrate fall risk with fracture risk. Best Practice & Research in Clinical Rheumatology, 23 6: 797-804. doi:10.1016/j.berh.2009.09.004


Author Peeters, G.M.E.E. (Geeske)
van Schoor, Natasja M.
Lips, Paul
Title Fall risk: the clinical relevance of falls and how to integrate fall risk with fracture risk
Journal name Best Practice & Research in Clinical Rheumatology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1521-6942
Publication date 2009-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.berh.2009.09.004
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 23
Issue 6
Start page 797
End page 804
Total pages 8
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Bailliere Tindall
Language eng
Abstract In old age, 5-10% percent of all falls result in a fracture, and up to 90% of all fractures result from a fall. This article describes the link between fall risk and fracture risk in community-dwelling older persons. Which factors attribute to both the fall risk and the fracture risk? Which falls result in a fracture? Which tools are available to predict falls and fractures? Directions for the use of prediction tools in clinical practice are given. Challenges for future research include further validation of existing prediction tools and evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of treatment after screening.
Keyword Accidental falls
Fracture
Risk profiles
Osteoporosis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Public Health Publications
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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