Is there a U-shaped association between physical activity and falling in older persons?

Peeters, G. M. E. E., van Schoor, N. M., Pluijm, S. M. F., Deeg, D. J. H. and Lips, P. (2010) Is there a U-shaped association between physical activity and falling in older persons?. Osteoporosis International, 21 7: 1189-1195. doi:10.1007/s00198-009-1053-4


Author Peeters, G. M. E. E.
van Schoor, N. M.
Pluijm, S. M. F.
Deeg, D. J. H.
Lips, P.
Title Is there a U-shaped association between physical activity and falling in older persons?
Journal name Osteoporosis International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0937-941X
1433-2965
Publication date 2010-07-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00198-009-1053-4
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 21
Issue 7
Start page 1189
End page 1195
Total pages 7
Place of publication Guildford, Surrey, England
Publisher Springer U K
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study tests whether the relationship between physical activity and (recurrent) falling is U-shaped. Among 1,337 community-dwelling older persons, no evidence for a nonlinear association was found. If all older persons increase their physical activity level with 100 units, 4% may be prevented to become recurrent fallers. Previous studies suggest a U-shaped relationship between physical activity and falling. This study tests this hypothesis and examines whether this relationship is modified by level of physical functioning. Community-dwelling persons (65+) from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA) were prospectively followed on falls for 3 years after baseline assessment in 1995/1996 (n = 1,337). Outcome measures were time to first fall and time to recurrent falling. The LASA Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to calculate physical activity in minutes per day weighted for intensity (range 0-2000). Physical functioning was measured with physical performance tests and self reported functional limitations. Confounders were age, sex, body mass index, chronic diseases, psychotropic medication, cognitive functioning, depressive symptoms, and fear of falling. No evidence for a nonlinear association was found (p for physical activity(2) > 0.20). No significant association was found between physical activity and time to first fall. An increase in physical activity of 100 units led to a 4% decrease in risk of recurrent falling (adjusted hazard ratio 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.92, 0.99). No interactions with physical performance or functional limitations were found (p > 0.50). The hypothesized U-shaped relationship between physical activity and falling could not be confirmed. At higher levels of physical activity, the risk of recurrent falling decreased, while no association was found with fall risk.

Keyword Accidental falls
Aged
Functional limitations.
Physical activity
Physical performance
Risk-Factors
Chronic Diseases
Community
Fractures
Men
Performance
Classification
Determinants
Prevalence
Prevention
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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