New direction in human colonisation of the Pacific: Lapita Settlement of South Coast New Guinea

McNiven, Ian J., David, Bruno, Richards, Thomas, Aplin, Ken, Asmussen, Brit, Mialanes, Jerome, Leavesley, Matthew, Faulkner, Patrick and Ulm, Sean (2011) New direction in human colonisation of the Pacific: Lapita Settlement of South Coast New Guinea. Australian Archaeology, 72 72: 1-6. doi:10.1080/03122417.2011.11690525


Author McNiven, Ian J.
David, Bruno
Richards, Thomas
Aplin, Ken
Asmussen, Brit
Mialanes, Jerome
Leavesley, Matthew
Faulkner, Patrick
Ulm, Sean
Title New direction in human colonisation of the Pacific: Lapita Settlement of South Coast New Guinea
Journal name Australian Archaeology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0312-2417
Publication date 2011-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/03122417.2011.11690525
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 72
Issue 72
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Place of publication Monash, VIC, Australia
Publisher Australian Archaeological Association
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Expansion of Austronesianspeaking peoples from the Bismarck Archipelago out into the Pacific commencing c.3300 cal BP epresents the last great chapter of human globalcolonisation. The earliest migrants were bearers of inelymade dentate-stamped Lapita pottery, hitherto found only across Island Melanesia and western Polynesia. We document the first known occurrence of Lapita n the New Guinea mainland. The new Lapita sites date from 2900 to 2500 cal BP and represent a newly-discovered migratory arm of Lapita expansions that moved westwards along the southern New Guinea coast towards Australia. These marine specialists ate shellfish, fish and marine turtles along the Papua New Guinea mainland coast, flecting subsistence continuities with local pre-Lapita peoples dating back to 4200 cal BP. Lapita artefacts include characteristic ceramics, shell armbands, stone adzes and obsidian tools. Our Lapita discoveries support hypotheses for the migration of pottery-bearing Melanesian marine specialists into Torres Strait of northeast Australia c.2500 cal BP
Keyword Calibration
Islands
Site
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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