A longitudinal analysis of complementary and alternative medicine use by a representative cohort of young Australian women with asthma, 1996-2006

Sibbritt, David, Adams, Jon and Lui, Chi-Wai (2011) A longitudinal analysis of complementary and alternative medicine use by a representative cohort of young Australian women with asthma, 1996-2006. Journal of Asthma, 48 4: 380-386. doi:10.3109/02770903.2011.560323


Author Sibbritt, David
Adams, Jon
Lui, Chi-Wai
Title A longitudinal analysis of complementary and alternative medicine use by a representative cohort of young Australian women with asthma, 1996-2006
Journal name Journal of Asthma   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9134
0277-0903
1532-4303
Publication date 2011-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/02770903.2011.560323
Volume 48
Issue 4
Start page 380
End page 386
Total pages 7
Place of publication New York, NY, U.S.A.
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background. There is evidence of asthma patients using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This article reports the findings of the first ever longitudinal study of CAM use among women with asthma from a large nationally representative sample.

Methods. A longitudinal analysis of questionnaires completed in 1996, 2000, 2003, and 2006 as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. The cohort began with 14,701 randomly selected young women (aged 18–22 years). CAM use was defined as a consultation with a range of complementary practitioners in the 12 months prior to each survey. Statistical analyses included the use of generalized estimating equations.

Results. Over the 10-year period, approximately 26% of the women were asthmatic. Asthmatic women were significantly more likely to use CAM (19%, 22%, and 36% for surveys 2–4, respectively) than non-asthmatic women (15%, 20%, and 32% for surveys 2–4, respectively). CAM use increased as time since asthma diagnosis increased. However, only the increase in consultations with a naturopath/herbalist remains statistically significant when the CAM modalities are considered individually alongside asthma status. The longitudinal model suggests that women with asthma are 1.13 (95% CI: 1.05–1.21) times more likely to consult with a CAM practitioner (p< .001). The study also shows that CAM users have a higher dissatisfaction with conventional healthcare services and consultations when compared to CAM non-users.

Conclusion. These findings suggest that women with asthma may turn to CAM after conventional care fails to adequately address their healthcare needs.
Keyword Alternative medicine
Asthma
Complementary medicine
Longitudinal studies
Women
Quality-of-life
Health Australia
Global burden
Therapy use
Care
Satisfaction
Management
Children
Parents
COPD
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published under "Alternative Medicine".

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 06 Sep 2011, 23:25:11 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health