Emergency surgical airway in life-threatening acute airway emergencies - Why are we so reluctant to do it?

Greenland, K.B., Acott, C., Segal, R., Goulding, G., Riley, R.H. and Merry, A.F. (2011) Emergency surgical airway in life-threatening acute airway emergencies - Why are we so reluctant to do it?. Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, 39 4: 578-584.

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Author Greenland, K.B.
Acott, C.
Segal, R.
Goulding, G.
Riley, R.H.
Merry, A.F.
Title Emergency surgical airway in life-threatening acute airway emergencies - Why are we so reluctant to do it?
Journal name Anaesthesia and Intensive Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0310-057X
Publication date 2011-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 39
Issue 4
Start page 578
End page 584
Total pages 7
Place of publication Edgecliff, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australian Society of Anaesthetists Ltd.
Language eng
Abstract 'Can't intubate, can't oxygenate' scenarios are rare but are often poorly managed, with potentially disastrous consequences. In our opinion, all doctors should be able to create a surgical airway if necessary. More practically, at least all anaesthetists should have this ability. There should be a change in culture to one that encourages and facilitates the performance of a life-saving emergency surgical airway when required. In this regard, an understanding of the human factors that influence the decision to perform an emergency surgical airway is as important as technical skill. Standardisation of difficult airway equipment in areas where anaesthesia is performed is a step toward ensuring that an emergency surgical airway will be performed appropriately. Information on the incidence and clinical management of 'can't intubate, can't oxygenate' scenarios should be compiled through various sources, including national coronial inquest databases and anaesthetic critical incident reporting systems. A systematic approach to teaching and maintaining human factors in airway crisis management and emergency surgical airway skills to anaesthetic trainees and specialists should be developed: in our opinion participation should be mandatory. Importantly, the view that performing an emergency surgical airway is an admission of anaesthetist failure should be strongly countered.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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