General rules for managing and surveying networks of pests, diseases, and endangered species

Chadès, Iadine, Martin, Tara G., Nicol, Samuel, Burgman, Mark A., Possingham, Hugh P. and Buckley, Yvonne M. (2011) General rules for managing and surveying networks of pests, diseases, and endangered species. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America, 108 20: 8323-8328. doi:10.1073/pnas.1016846108


Author Chadès, Iadine
Martin, Tara G.
Nicol, Samuel
Burgman, Mark A.
Possingham, Hugh P.
Buckley, Yvonne M.
Title General rules for managing and surveying networks of pests, diseases, and endangered species
Journal name Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
1091-6490
Publication date 2011-05-17
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1016846108
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 108
Issue 20
Start page 8323
End page 8328
Total pages 6
Editor Simon A. Levin
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher National Academy of Sciences
Language eng
Abstract The efficient management of diseases, pests, or endangered species is an important global issue faced by agencies constrained by limited resources. The management challenge is even greater when organisms are difficult to detect. We show how to prioritize management and survey effort across time and space for networks of susceptible-infected-susceptible subpopulations. We present simple and robust rules of thumb for protecting desirable, or eradicating undesirable, subpopulations connected in typical network patterns (motifs). We further demonstrate that these rules can be generalized to larger networks when motifs are combined in more complex formations. Results show that the best location to manage or survey a pest or a disease on a network is also the best location to protect or survey an endangered species. The optimal starting point in a network is the fastest motif to manage, where line, star, island, and cluster motifs range from fast to slow. Managing the most connected node at the right time and maintaining the same management direction provide advantages over previously recommended outside-in strategies. When a species or disease is not detected and our belief in persistence decreases, our results recommend shifting resources toward management or surveillance of the most connected nodes. Our analytic approximation provides guidance on how long we should manage or survey networks for hard-to-detect organisms. Our rules take into account management success, dispersal, economic cost, and imperfect detection and offer managers a practical basis for managing networks relevant to many significant environmental, biosecurity, and human health issues.
Formatted abstract
The efficient management of diseases, pests, or endangered species is an important global issue faced by agencies constrained by limited resources. The management challenge is even greater when organisms are difficult to detect. We show how to prioritize management and survey effort across time and space for networks of susceptible–infected–susceptible subpopulations. We present simple and robust rules of thumb for protecting desirable, or eradicating undesirable, subpopulations connected in typical network patterns (motifs). We further demonstrate that these rules can be generalized to larger networks when motifs are combined in more complex formations. Results show that the best location to manage or survey a pest or a disease on a network is also the best location to protect or survey an endangered species. The optimal starting point in a network is the fastest motif to manage, where line, star, island, and cluster motifs range from fast to slow. Managing the most connected node at the right time and maintaining the same management direction provide advantages over previously recommended outside–in strategies. When a species or disease is not detected and our belief in persistence decreases, our results recommend shifting resources toward management or surveillance of the most connected nodes. Our analytic approximation provides guidance on how long we should manage or survey networks for hard-to-detect organisms. Our rules take into account management success, dispersal, economic cost, and imperfect detection and offer managers a practical basis for managing networks relevant to many significant environmental, biosecurity, and human health issues.
Keyword Conservation planning
Decision theory
Metapopulation
Optimization
Markov decision process
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 03 Sep 2011, 02:35:57 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences