Effects of geography and life history traits on genetic differentiation in benthic marine fishes

Riginos, Cynthia, Douglas, Kristin E., Jin, Young, Shanahan, Danielle F. and Treml, Eric A. (2011) Effects of geography and life history traits on genetic differentiation in benthic marine fishes. Ecography, 34 4: 566-575. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0587.2010.06511.x


Author Riginos, Cynthia
Douglas, Kristin E.
Jin, Young
Shanahan, Danielle F.
Treml, Eric A.
Title Effects of geography and life history traits on genetic differentiation in benthic marine fishes
Journal name Ecography   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0906-7590
1600-0587
Publication date 2011-08-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1600-0587.2010.06511.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 34
Issue 4
Start page 566
End page 575
Total pages 10
Place of publication Malden, MA, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Dispersal of planktonic larvae can create connections between geographically separated adult populations of benthic marine animals. How geographic context and life history traits affect these connections is largely unresolved. We use data from genetic studies (species level FST) of benthic teleost fishes combined with linear models to evaluate the importance of transitions between biogeographic regions, geographic distance, egg type (benthic or pelagic eggs), pelagic larval duration (PLD), and type of genetic marker as factors affecting differentiation within species. We find that transitions between biogeographic regions and egg type are significant and consistent contributors to population genetic structure, whereas PLD does not significantly explain population structure. Total study distance frequently contributes to significant interaction terms, particularly in association with genetic markers, whereby FST increases with study distance for studies employing mtDNA sequences, but allozyme and microsatellite studies show no increase in FST with study distance. These results highlight the importance of spatial context (biogeography and geographic distance) in affecting genetic differentiation and imply that there are inherent differences in dispersal ability associated with egg type. We also find that the geographic distance over which the maximum pairwise FST between populations occurs (relative to total study distance) is highly variable and can be observed at any scale. This result is consistent with stochastic processes inflating genetic differentiation and/or insufficient consideration of geographic and biological factors relevant to connectivity.
Formatted abstract
Dispersal of planktonic larvae can create connections between geographically separated adult populations of benthic marine animals. How geographic context and life history traits affect these connections is largely unresolved. We use data from genetic studies (species level FST) of benthic teleost fishes combined with linear models to evaluate the importance of transitions between biogeographic regions, geographic distance, egg type (benthic or pelagic eggs), pelagic larval duration (PLD), and type of genetic marker as factors affecting differentiation within species. We find that transitions between biogeographic regions and egg type are significant and consistent contributors to population genetic structure, whereas PLD does not significantly explain population structure. Total study distance frequently contributes to significant interaction terms, particularly in association with genetic markers, whereby FST increases with study distance for studies employing mtDNA sequences, but allozyme and microsatellite studies show no increase in FST with study distance. These results highlight the importance of spatial context (biogeography and geographic distance) in affecting genetic differentiation and imply that there are inherent differences in dispersal ability associated with egg type. We also find that the geographic distance over which the maximum pairwise FST between populations occurs (relative to total study distance) is highly variable and can be observed at any scale. This result is consistent with stochastic processes inflating genetic differentiation and/or insufficient consideration of geographic and biological factors relevant to connectivity.
Keyword Pelagic larval duration
Coral reef fishes
Great Barrier Reef
Ocean currents
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP0878306
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 30 Aug 2011, 21:16:55 EST by Dr Eric Treml on behalf of School of Biological Sciences