Transferring preterm infants from incubators to open cots at 1600 g: A multicentre randomised controlled trial

New, K., Flint, A., Bogossian, F., East, C. and Davies, M. W. (2012) Transferring preterm infants from incubators to open cots at 1600 g: A multicentre randomised controlled trial. Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, 97 3: F88-F92. doi:10.1136/adc.2011.213587

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Author New, K.
Flint, A.
Bogossian, F.
East, C.
Davies, M. W.
Title Transferring preterm infants from incubators to open cots at 1600 g: A multicentre randomised controlled trial
Journal name Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1359-2998
1468-2052
Publication date 2012-03-03
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/adc.2011.213587
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 97
Issue 3
Start page F88
End page F92
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BMJ Group
Language eng
Subject 2735 Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
2729 Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Abstract Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, as a consequence of preterm birth, is a major cause of early mortality and morbidity. The withdrawal of progesterone, either actual or functional, is thought to be an antecedent to the onset of labour. There remains limited information on clinically relevant health outcomes as to whether vaginal progesterone may be of benefit for pregnant women with a history of a previous preterm birth, who are at high risk of a recurrence. Our primary aim was to assess whether the use of vaginal progesterone pessaries in women with a history of previous spontaneous preterm birth reduced the risk and severity of respiratory distress syndrome in their infants, with secondary aims of examining the effects on other neonatal morbidities and maternal health and assessing the adverse effects of treatment.
Formatted abstract
Objectives: To determine the effects on weight gain and temperature control of transferring preterm infants from incubators to open cots at a weight of 1600 g versus a weight of 1800 g.

Design:
Randomised controlled trial.

Setting: One tertiary and two regional neonatal units in public hospitals in Queensland, Australia.

Participants:
182 preterm infants born with a birth weight less than 1600 g, who were at least 48 hold; had not required ventilation or continuous positive airways pressure within the last 48 h; were medically stable with no oxygen requirement, or significant apnoea or bradycardia; did not require phototherapy; and were enterally fed with an intake (breast milk/formula) of at least 60 ml/kg/day.

Interventions: Transfer into an open cot at 1600 or 1800 g.

Main outcome measures: The primary outcomes were temperature stability and average daily weight gain over the first 14 days following transfer to an open cot.

Results: 90 infants in the 1600 g group and 92 infants in the 1800 g group were included in the analysis. Over the first 72 h, more infants in the 1800 g group had temperatures <36.4°C than the 1600 g group (p=0.03). From post-transfer to discharge, the 1600 g group had more temperatures >37.1°C (p=0.02). Average daily weight gain in the 1600 g group was 17.07 (SD±4.5) g/kg/day and in the 1800 g group, 13.97 (SD±4.7) g/kg/day (p=<0.001).

Conclusions: Medically stable, preterm infants can be transferred to open cots at a birth weight of 1600 g without any significant adverse effects on temperature stability or weight gain.

Trial registration:
ACTRN12606000518561
Keyword Pediatrics
Pediatrics
PEDIATRICS
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published Online First 3 August 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 23 Aug 2011, 01:15:18 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work