Epidemiology and impact of Neospora caninum infection in three Queensland tropical dairy herds

Landmann, J. K., Gunn, A. A., O'Donoghue, P. J., Tranter, W. P. and McGowan, M. R. (2011) Epidemiology and impact of Neospora caninum infection in three Queensland tropical dairy herds. Reproduction in Domestic Animals, 46 4: 734-737. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0531.2010.01712.x


Author Landmann, J. K.
Gunn, A. A.
O'Donoghue, P. J.
Tranter, W. P.
McGowan, M. R.
Title Epidemiology and impact of Neospora caninum infection in three Queensland tropical dairy herds
Formatted title
Epidemiology and impact of Neospora caninum infection in three Queensland tropical dairy herds
Journal name Reproduction in Domestic Animals   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0936-6768
1439-0531
Publication date 2011-08-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1439-0531.2010.01712.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 46
Issue 4
Start page 734
End page 737
Total pages 4
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Verlag
Language eng
Abstract This study investigated the epidemiology of Neospora caninum in three tropical dairy herds in North Queensland, Australia. All animals in the herds were bled, and the sera were tested by ELISA for N. caninum antibodies. Herd records were examined, and the number of calves carried to term and the number of abortions which occurred over the lifetime of each animal were recorded to determine the abortion rate for each animal. Pedigrees were constructed for two of the herds to investigate whether vertical transmission was occurring. The seroprevalence of N. caninum ranged from 23% to 34%. The abortion rate in seropositive animals was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than in seronegative animals in all three herds (12-20.1% cf. 3.6-7%). Overall, the probability of a calf being seropositive was 3.5 times higher when the dam was also seropositive than when the dam was seronegative. Subsequent selective breeding employed by one herd reduced the N. caninum seroprevalence from 23% to 5% over a 9-year period. This study shows that N. caninum infection is prevalent in North Queensland dairy cattle, and both post-natal infection and vertical transmission are common.
Formatted abstract
This study investigated the epidemiology of Neospora caninum in three tropical dairy herds in North Queensland, Australia. All animals in the herds were bled, and the sera were tested by ELISA for N. caninum antibodies. Herd records were examined, and the number of calves carried to term and the number of abortions which occurred over the lifetime of each animal were recorded to determine the abortion rate for each animal. Pedigrees were constructed for two of the herds to investigate whether vertical transmission was occurring. The seroprevalence of N. caninum ranged from 23% to 34%. The abortion rate in seropositive animals was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than in seronegative animals in all three herds (12–20.1% cf. 3.6–7%). Overall, the probability of a calf being seropositive was 3.5 times higher when the dam was also seropositive than when the dam was seronegative. Subsequent selective breeding employed by one herd reduced the N. caninum seroprevalence from 23% to 5% over a 9-year period. This study shows that N. caninum infection is prevalent in North Queensland dairy cattle, and both post-natal infection and vertical transmission are common.
Keyword Exogenous transplacental infection
Abortion risk
Cattle
Transmission
Cows
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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