Projecting coral reef futures under global warming and ocean acidification

Pandolfi, John M., Connolly, Sean R., Marshall, Dustin J. and Cohen, Anne A. (2011) Projecting coral reef futures under global warming and ocean acidification. Science, 333 6041: 418-422. doi:10.1126/science.1204794


Author Pandolfi, John M.
Connolly, Sean R.
Marshall, Dustin J.
Cohen, Anne A.
Title Projecting coral reef futures under global warming and ocean acidification
Journal name Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0036-8075
Publication date 2011-07-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1126/science.1204794
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 333
Issue 6041
Start page 418
End page 422
Total pages 5
Place of publication United States
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science
Language eng
Abstract Many physiological responses in present-day coral reefs to climate change are interpreted as consistent with the imminent disappearance of modern reefs globally because of annual mass bleaching events, carbonate dissolution, and insufficient time for substantial evolutionary responses. Emerging evidence for variability in the coral calcification response to acidification, geographical variation in bleaching susceptibility and recovery, responses to past climate change, and potential rates of adaptation to rapid warming supports an alternative scenario in which reef degradation occurs with greater temporal and spatial heterogeneity than current projections suggest. Reducing uncertainty in projecting coral reef futures requires improved understanding of past responses to rapid climate change; physiological responses to interacting factors, such as temperature, acidification, and nutrients; and the costs and constraints imposed by acclimation and adaptation.
Formatted abstract
Many physiological responses in present-day coral reefs to climate change are interpreted as consistent with the imminent disappearance of modern reefs globally because of annual mass bleaching events, carbonate dissolution, and insufficient time for substantial evolutionary responses. Emerging evidence for variability in the coral calcification response to acidification, geographical variation in bleaching susceptibility and recovery, responses to past climate change, and potential rates of adaptation to rapid warming supports an alternative scenario in which reef degradation occurs with greater temporal and spatial heterogeneity than current projections suggest. Reducing uncertainty in projecting coral reef futures requires improved understanding of past responses to rapid climate change; physiological responses to interacting factors, such as temperature, acidification, and nutrients; and the costs and constraints imposed by acclimation and adaptation.
Keyword Great-Barrier-Reef
Carbonate-Ion Concentration
Co2 Partial-Pressure
Climate-Change
Thermal-Stress
Thermohaline Circulation
Scleractinian Corals
Last Deglaciation
Porites-Compressa
Saturation State
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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