Sedentary behaviors and subsequent health outcomes in adults: A systematic review of longitudinal studies, 1996-2011

Thorp, Alicia A., Owen, Neville, Neuhaus, Maike and Dunstan, David W. (2011) Sedentary behaviors and subsequent health outcomes in adults: A systematic review of longitudinal studies, 1996-2011. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 41 2: 207-215. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2011.05.004


Author Thorp, Alicia A.
Owen, Neville
Neuhaus, Maike
Dunstan, David W.
Title Sedentary behaviors and subsequent health outcomes in adults: A systematic review of longitudinal studies, 1996-2011
Journal name American Journal of Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0749-3797
1873-2607
Publication date 2011-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.05.004
Volume 41
Issue 2
Start page 207
End page 215
Total pages 9
Place of publication New York, NY, U.S.A.
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Context: To systematically review and provide an informative synthesis of findings from longitudinal studies published since 1996 reporting on relationships between self-reported sedentary behavior and device-based measures of sedentary time with health-related outcomes in adults.

Evidence acquisition: Studies published between 1996 and January 2011 were identified by examining existing literature reviews and by systematic searches in Web of Science, MEDLINE, PubMed, and PsycINFO. English-written articles were selected according to study design, targeted behavior, and health outcome.

Evidence synthesis: Forty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria; of these, 46 incorporated self-reported measures including total sitting time; TV viewing time only; TV viewing time and other screen-time behaviors; and TV viewing time plus other sedentary behaviors. Findings indicate a consistent relationship of self-reported sedentary behavior with mortality and with weight gain from childhood to the adult years. However, findings were mixed for associations with disease incidence, weight gain during adulthood, and cardiometabolic risk. Of the three studies that used device-based measures of sedentary time, one showed that markers of obesity predicted sedentary time, whereas inconclusive findings have been observed for markers of insulin resistance.

Conclusions: There is a growing body of evidence that sedentary behavior may be a distinct risk factor, independent of physical activity, for multiple adverse health outcomes in adults. Prospective studies using device-based measures are required to provide a clearer understanding of the impact of sedentary time on health outcomes.
Keyword Recreational physical-activity
Lipoprotein-lipase activity
Type-2 diabetes-mellitus
Television viewing time
Population-based cohort
NIH–AARP diet
Weight-gain
Cardiovascular-disease
Sitting time
Endometrial cancer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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