Adults' sedentary behavior determinants and interventions

Owen, Neville, Sugiyama, Takemi, Eakin, Elizabeth E., Gardiner, Paul A., Tremblay, Mark S. and Sallis, James F. (2011) Adults' sedentary behavior determinants and interventions. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 41 2: 189-196. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2011.05.013


Author Owen, Neville
Sugiyama, Takemi
Eakin, Elizabeth E.
Gardiner, Paul A.
Tremblay, Mark S.
Sallis, James F.
Title Adults' sedentary behavior determinants and interventions
Journal name American Journal of Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0749-3797
1873-2607
Publication date 2011-08-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.05.013
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 41
Issue 2
Start page 189
End page 196
Total pages 8
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2713 Epidemiology
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract Research is now required on factors influencing adults' sedentary behaviors, and effective approaches to behavioral-change intervention must be identified. The strategies for influencing sedentary behavior will need to be informed by evidence on the most important modifiable behavioral determinants. However, much of the available evidence relevant to understanding the determinants of sedentary behaviors is from cross-sectional studies, which are limited in that they identify only behavioral "correlates." As is the case for physical activity, a behavior- and context-specific approach is needed to understand the multiple determinants operating in the different settings within which these behaviors are most prevalent. To this end, an ecologic model of sedentary behaviors is described, highlighting the behavior settings construct. The behaviors and contexts of primary concern are TV viewing and other screen-focused behaviors in domestic environments, prolonged sitting in the workplace, and time spent sitting in automobiles. Research is needed to clarify the multiple levels of determinants of prolonged sitting time, which are likely to operate in distinct ways in these different contexts. Controlled trials on the feasibility and efficacy of interventions to reduce and break up sedentary behaviors among adults in domestic, workplace, and transportation environments are particularly required. It would be informative for the field to have evidence on the outcomes of "natural experiments," such as the introduction of nonseated working options in occupational environments or new transportation infrastructure in communities. (Am J Prev Med 2011;41(2):189-196) (C) 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Formatted abstract
Research is now required on factors influencing adults' sedentary behaviors, and effective approaches to behavioral-change intervention must be identified. The strategies for influencing sedentary behavior will need to be informed by evidence on the most important modifiable behavioral determinants. However, much of the available evidence relevant to understanding the determinants of sedentary behaviors is from cross-sectional studies, which are limited in that they identify only behavioral "correlates." As is the case for physical activity, a behavior- and context-specific approach is needed to understand the multiple determinants operating in the different settings within which these behaviors are most prevalent. To this end, an ecologic model of sedentary behaviors is described, highlighting the behavior settings construct. The behaviors and contexts of primary concern are TV viewing and other screen-focused behaviors in domestic environments, prolonged sitting in the workplace, and time spent sitting in automobiles. Research is needed to clarify the multiple levels of determinants of prolonged sitting time, which are likely to operate in distinct ways in these different contexts. Controlled trials on the feasibility and efficacy of interventions to reduce and break up sedentary behaviors among adults in domestic, workplace, and transportation environments are particularly required. It would be informative for the field to have evidence on the outcomes of "natural experiments," such as the introduction of nonseated working options in occupational environments or new transportation infrastructure in communities.
Keyword Physical-Activity Intervention
Randomized-Controlled-Trial
Television Viewing Time
Neighborhood Walkability
Built Environments
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 569940
569940
PP 06B 2889
CA127296
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Theme: The science of sedentary behavior

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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