Bone mineral accrual from 8 to 30 years of age: An estimation of peak bone mass

Baxter-Jones, Adam D.G., Faulkner, Robert A., Forwood, Mark R., Mirwald, Robert L. and Bailey, Donald A. (2011) Bone mineral accrual from 8 to 30 years of age: An estimation of peak bone mass. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 26 8: 1729-1739. doi:10.1002/jbmr.412


Author Baxter-Jones, Adam D.G.
Faulkner, Robert A.
Forwood, Mark R.
Mirwald, Robert L.
Bailey, Donald A.
Title Bone mineral accrual from 8 to 30 years of age: An estimation of peak bone mass
Journal name Journal of Bone and Mineral Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0884-0431
1523-4681
Publication date 2011-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/jbmr.412
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 26
Issue 8
Start page 1729
End page 1739
Total pages 11
Place of publication Malden, MA, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Bone area (BA) and bone mineral content (BMC) were measured from childhood to young adulthood at the total body (TB), lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), and femoral neck (FN). BA and BMC values were expressed as a percentage of young-adult values to determine if and when values reached a plateau. Data were aligned on biological ages [years from peak height velocity (PHV)] to control for maturity. TB BA increased significantly from -4 to +4 years from PHV, with TB BMC reaching a plateau, on average, 2 years later at +6 years from PHV (equates to 18 and 20 years of age in girls and boys, respectively). LS BA increased significantly from -4 years from PHV to +3 years from PHV, whereas LS BMC increased until +4 from PHV. FN BA increased between -4 and +1 years from PHV, with FN BMC reaching a plateau, on average, 1 year later at +2 years from PHV. In the circumpubertal years (-2 to +2 years from PHV): 39% of the young-adult BMC was accrued at the TB in both males and females; 43% and 46% was accrued in males and females at the LS and TH, respectively; 33% (males and females) was accrued at the FN. In summary, we provide strong evidence that BA plateaus 1 to 2 years earlier than BMC. Depending on the skeletal site, peak bone mass occurs by the end of the second or early in the third decade of life. The data substantiate the importance of the circumpubertal years for accruing bone mineral.
Keyword Children
Adolescence
Growth
Bone Mineral Accrual
Peak Bone Mass
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 20 July 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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