Determining optimal incubation temperature for a head-start program: The effect of incubation temperature on hatchling Burnett River snapping turtles (Elseya albagula)

Eiby, Yvonne A. and Booth, David T. (2011) Determining optimal incubation temperature for a head-start program: The effect of incubation temperature on hatchling Burnett River snapping turtles (Elseya albagula). Australian Journal of Zoology, 59 1: 18-25. doi:10.1071/ZO10080


Author Eiby, Yvonne A.
Booth, David T.
Title Determining optimal incubation temperature for a head-start program: The effect of incubation temperature on hatchling Burnett River snapping turtles (Elseya albagula)
Formatted title
Determining optimal incubation temperature for a head-start program: The effect of incubation temperature on hatchling Burnett River snapping turtles (Elseya albagula)
Journal name Australian Journal of Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-959X
1446-5698
Publication date 2011-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/ZO10080
Volume 59
Issue 1
Start page 18
End page 25
Total pages 8
Place of publication Collingwood, VIC, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study monitored natural nest temperatures and examined the effect of incubation temperature on hatchling phenotype of the freshwater turtle Elseya albagula to determine the optimal temperature for a potential head-start program. Eggs were incubated at constant temperatures (26°C, 28°C and 30°C) to determine the influence of temperature on incubation period, hatchling morphology, swimming performance and post-hatching growth rate. Hatchlings incubated at 26°C had longer plastrons than hatchlings from 30°C and swam faster, three days after hatching, than did hatchlings incubated at either 28°C or 30°C. Incubation temperature also provided a source of variation in hatchling scute patterns. Clutch of origin influenced hatchling mass and size, growth at 184 days after hatching, and the swimming performance of 3-day and 75-day post-hatch hatchlings. Constant temperatures of 26°C and 28°C produced the highest hatching success and highest-quality hatchlings and are therefore recommended for incubation of eggs in a head-start program. In the field, unshaded nests experienced greater daily fluctuations in temperature and higher temperatures overall compared with shaded nests, such that unshaded nest temperatures approached the upper thermal limit to development.
Keyword Hatchling
Fresh-water turtle
Locomotor performance
Chelydra-serpentina
Chelodina-expansa
Embryo mortality
Apalone-mutica
Eggs
Growth
Chelidae
Queensland
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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