Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria: past history and future trends

Morgan, J. A. T., Dejong, R. J., Snyder, S. D., Mkoji, G. M. and Loker, E. S. (2001) Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria: past history and future trends. Parasitology, 123 SUPPL.: S211-S228.


Author Morgan, J. A. T.
Dejong, R. J.
Snyder, S. D.
Mkoji, G. M.
Loker, E. S.
Title Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria: past history and future trends
Formatted title
Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria: past history and future trends
Journal name Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-1820
1469-8161
Publication date 2001-11-01
Year available 2001
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 123
Issue SUPPL.
Start page S211
End page S228
Total pages 18
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Abstract Schistosoma mansoni is one of the most abundant infectious agents of humankind. Its widespread distribution is permitted by the broad geographic range of susceptible species of the freshwater snail genus Biomphalaria that serve as obligatory hosts for its larval stages. Molecular phylogenetic studies suggest that Schistosoma originated in Asia, and that a pulmonate-transmitted progenitor colonized Africa and gave rise to both terminal-spined and lateral-spined egg species groups, the latter containing S. mansoni. Schistosoma mansoni likely appeared only after the trans-Atlantic dispersal of Biomphalaria from the Neotropics to Africa, an event that, based on the present African fossil record, occurred only 2-5 million years ago. This parasite became abundant in tropical Africa and then entered the 'New World with the slave trade. It prospered in the Neotropics because a remarkably susceptible and productive host, B. glabrata, was widely distributed there. Indeed, a snail similar to B. glabrata may have given rise to the African species of Biomphalaria. Schistosoma mansoni has since spread into other Neotropical Biomphalaria species and mammalian hosts. The distribution of S. mansoni is in a state of flux. In Egypt, S. mansoni has nearly completely replaced S. haematobium in the Nile Delta, and has spread to other regions of the country. A susceptible host snail, B. straminea, has been introduced into Asia and there is evidence of S. mansoni transmission in Nepal. Dam and barrage construction has lead to an epidemic of S. mansoni in Senegal, and the parasite continues its spread in Brazil. Because of competition with introduced aquatic species and environmental changes, B. glabrata and consequently S. mansoni have become less abundant on the Caribbean islands. Control of S. mansoni using praziquantel and oxamniquine has reduced global prevalence but control is difficult to sustain, and S. mansoni can develop tolerance/resistance to praziquantel, raising concerns about its future efficacy. Because of legitimate environmental concerns, snail control is unlikely to be an option in future control efforts. Global warming will impact the distribution of Biomphalaria and S. mansoni, but the magnitude and nature of the effects are poorly understood.
Formatted abstract
Schistosoma mansoni is one of the most abundant infectious agents of humankind. Its widespread distribution is permitted by the broad geographic range of susceptible species of the freshwater snail genus Biomphalaria that serve as obligatory hosts for its larval stages. Molecular phylogenetic studies suggest that Schistosoma originated in Asia, and that a pulmonate-transmitted progenitor colonized Africa and gave rise to both terminal-spined and lateral-spined egg species groups, the latter containing S. mansoni. Schistosoma mansoni likely appeared only after the trans-Atlantic dispersal of Biomphalaria from the Neotropics to Africa, an event that, based on the present African fossil record, occurred only 2–5 million years ago. This parasite became abundant in tropical Africa and then entered the New World with the slave trade. It prospered in the Neotropics because a remarkably susceptible and productive host, B. glabrata, was widely distributed there. Indeed, a snail similar to B. glabrata may have given rise to the African species of Biomphalaria. Schistosoma mansoni has since spread into other Neotropical Biomphalaria species and mammalian hosts. The distribution of S. mansoni is in a state of flux. In Egypt, S. mansoni has nearly completely replaced S. haematobium in the Nile Delta, and has spread to other regions of the country. A susceptible host snail, B. straminea, has been introduced into Asia and there is evidence of S. mansoni transmission in Nepal. Dam and barrage construction has lead to an epidemic of S. mansoni in Senegal, and the parasite continues its spread in Brazil. Because of competition with introduced aquatic species and environmental changes, B. glabrata and consequently S. mansoni have become less abundant on the Caribbean islands. Control of S. mansoni using praziquantel and oxamniquine has reduced global prevalence but control is difficult to sustain, and S. mansoni can develop tolerance/resistance to praziquantel, raising concerns about its future efficacy. Because of legitimate environmental concerns, snail control is unlikely to be an option in future control efforts. Global warming will impact the distribution of Biomphalaria and S. mansoni, but the magnitude and nature of the effects are poorly understood.
Keyword Schistosoma mansoni
Biomphalaria
Evolution
Distribution
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID AI44913
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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