Medical specialists' accounts of the impact of the Internet on the doctor/patient relationship

Broom, Alex (2005) Medical specialists' accounts of the impact of the Internet on the doctor/patient relationship. Health, 9 3: 319-338. doi:10.1177/1363459305052903


Author Broom, Alex
Title Medical specialists' accounts of the impact of the Internet on the doctor/patient relationship
Journal name Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1363-4593
1461-7196
Publication date 2005-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1363459305052903
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 9
Issue 3
Start page 319
End page 338
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Abstract In the context of health service delivery, deprofessionalization denotes a trend towards a demystification of medical expertise and increasing lay scepticism about health professionals, suggesting a decline in the power and status of the medical profession. This process has been linked to increasing consumerism, the rise of complementary medicine and the emergence of the Internet. Drawing on data from in-depth interviews with prostate cancer specialists, this article explores their experiences of the Internet user within the context of the medical consultation. Results suggest that the deprofessionalization thesis is inadequate for capturing the complex and varying ways in which specialists view, and respond to, the Internet-informed patient. It is argued that the ways in which these specialists are adapting to the Internet and the Internet user should be viewed as strategic responses, rather than reflecting a breakdown in their authority or status. ‘Enlistment’ and ‘translation’ are presented as useful conceptual tools for understanding specialists’ experiences of the Internet.
Keyword Deprofessionalization
Doctor/patient relationship
Internet
Prostate cancer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences - Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 07 Aug 2011, 21:22:24 EST by Rachel Smith on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences