Dangerous carers: pastoral power and the caring teacher of contemporary Australian schooling

McCuaig, Louise Anne (2012) Dangerous carers: pastoral power and the caring teacher of contemporary Australian schooling. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 44 8: 862-877. doi:10.1111/j.1469-5812.2011.00760.x

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Author McCuaig, Louise Anne
Title Dangerous carers: pastoral power and the caring teacher of contemporary Australian schooling
Journal name Educational Philosophy and Theory   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0013-1857
1469-5812
Publication date 2012-10-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-5812.2011.00760.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 44
Issue 8
Start page 862
End page 877
Total pages 16
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 3304 Education
1207 History and Philosophy of Science
Abstract Whilst care imperatives have arisen across the breadth of Western societies, within the education sector they appear both prolific and urgent. This paper explores the deployment of care discourses within education generally and draws upon the case of Australian Health and Physical Education (HPE) more specifically, to undertake a Foucauldian interrogation of care. In so doing I demonstrate the usefulness of Foucault's pastoral power lens and its capacity to provide insight into the moral and ethical work conducted by caring teachers on behalf of the state (Acker, 1995). Following a brief overview of the advocacy, challenges and debates surrounding the issue of caring teaching within education, I draw on the work of Hunter (1994) and three case studies from a genealogical interrogation of HPE that employed Foucualt's ethical fourfold as a heuristic device to reveal the ethical practices and objectives of the good HPE teacher. Drawing on this genealogical work, I argue that HPE teachers and their colleagues have been purposefully incited to constitute themselves as agents of pastoral power. From this Foucauldian perspective, I conclude with an exploration of the unintended and possibly dangerous practices of caring teaching that may emerge within the complex and messy nexus of contemporary self-constitution.
Formatted abstract
Whilst care imperatives have arisen across the breadth of Western societies, within the education
sector they appear both prolific and urgent.This paper explores the deployment of care discourses
within education generally and draws upon the case of Australian Health and Physical Education
(HPE) more specifically, to undertake a Foucauldian interrogation of care. In so doing
I demonstrate the usefulness of Foucault’s pastoral power lens and its capacity to provide insight
into the moral and ethical work conducted by caring teachers on behalf of the state (Acker,
1995). Following a brief overview of the advocacy, challenges and debates surrounding the issue
of caring teaching within education, I draw on the work of Hunter (1994) and three case studies
from a genealogical interrogation of HPE that employed Foucualt’s ethical fourfold as a heuristic
device to reveal the ethical practices and objectives of the good HPE teacher. Drawing on this
genealogical work, I argue that HPE teachers and their colleagues have been purposefully incited
to constitute themselves as agents of pastoral power. From this Foucauldian perspective, I
conclude with an exploration of the unintended and possibly ‘dangerous’ practices of caring
teaching that may emerge within the complex and messy nexus of contemporary self-constitution.
Keyword Care ethics
Pastoral power
Caring teaching
Foucault
Ethics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 16 JUN 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 24 Jul 2011, 21:50:05 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences