Intravenous immune globulin for hypogammaglobulinemia: A comparison of opsonizing capacity in recipient sera

Steele, Russell W., Augustine, R. Ann, Tannenbaum, A. Susan and Marmer, Daniel J. (1985) Intravenous immune globulin for hypogammaglobulinemia: A comparison of opsonizing capacity in recipient sera. Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology, 34 3: 275-283. doi:10.1016/0090-1229(85)90176-X


Author Steele, Russell W.
Augustine, R. Ann
Tannenbaum, A. Susan
Marmer, Daniel J.
Title Intravenous immune globulin for hypogammaglobulinemia: A comparison of opsonizing capacity in recipient sera
Journal name Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0090-1229
1521-7035
Publication date 1985-03-01
Year available 1985
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0090-1229(85)90176-X
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 34
Issue 3
Start page 275
End page 283
Total pages 9
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Twelve severely hypogammaglobulinemic patients received infusions of alkylated immuneglobulin and two other native nonalkylated products. Administration was separated by an interval of 3 weeks. Serum was obtained prior to and at 24 hr and 3 weeks after each infusion for measurement of total IgG, specific and opsonizing antibodies. The latter was accomplished against Streptococcus pneumoniae types 5, 12F and 14 and zymosan using chemiluminescence methodology. Changes in total IgG concentrations were comparable for the three products. Prior to enrollment, IgG levels averaged 115 ± 72 mg/dl, increasing to 779 ± 399 at 24 hr postinfusion, and were 337 ± 200 after 3 weeks. No differences among the products were seen in their ability to produce antibodies against Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, rubella, toxoplasma, cytomegalo-virus, or tetanus. However, differences in opsonizing antibody were observed between alkylated and native IgG preparations. Peak chemiluminescence responses of neutrophils following opsonization of S. pneumoniae with native immuneglobulin were significantly higher than with alkylated IgG, indicating greater functional capacity. These studies suggest that native immuneserumglobulin provides a greater potential for augmenting host defecse mechanisms against pneumococcal infection in hypogammaglobulinemic patients.
Keyword Immunology
Pathology
Immunology
Pathology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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