The association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels with fracture risk in postmenopausal women: Geelong osteoporosis study

Pasco, J. A., Kotowicz, M. A., Henry, I. J., Spilsbury, H., Nicholson, G. C., Box, J. and Schneider, H. G. (2005). The association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels with fracture risk in postmenopausal women: Geelong osteoporosis study. In: 27th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, Nashville, TN, United States, (S87-S87). 23-27 September 2005. doi:10.1002/jbmr.5650201303


Author Pasco, J. A.
Kotowicz, M. A.
Henry, I. J.
Spilsbury, H.
Nicholson, G. C.
Box, J.
Schneider, H. G.
Title of paper The association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels with fracture risk in postmenopausal women: Geelong osteoporosis study
Conference name 27th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
Conference location Nashville, TN, United States
Conference dates 23-27 September 2005
Journal name Journal of Bone and Mineral Research   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Malden, MA, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1002/jbmr.5650201303
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISSN 0884-0431
1523-4681
Volume 20
Issue S1
Start page S87
End page S87
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Reduced bone mass and increased risk of fracture are common among patients with inflammatory diseases. Furthermore, mediators of inflammation like IL-6 or TNFa have been shown to stimulate bone resorption. Systemic inflammation may be implicated in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis. We therefore tested the association between serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels and risk of fracture in 744 postmenopausal women randomly-selected from the community and enrolled in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study, 1994-7. Baseline hsCRP levels were measured using a high-sensitivity immunoturbimetrical assay; BMD was also measured at baseline. Fractures were identified from radiological reports. Subjects were followed longitudinally until the end of 2002, or until sustaining a fracture, death, or migration from the study region. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to determine the association between hsCRP and fracture. 126 fractures were sustained during 4013 person-years of follow-up. Median hsCRP concentration was 2.5 mg/L (IQR 1.3-4.9). After adjusting for potential confounders, women with hsCRP in the highest quartile (>4.9 mg/L) had a 1.6-fold (95%CI 1.1-2.4) greater risk of fracture than the lower quartiles pooled, independent of BMD. Both increased hsCRP and increased bone deficits contributed to increased fracture risk. Using hsCRP quartiles 1-3 and normal hip BMD (T-score>-1.0) as the referent group, women in the highest hsCRP quartile and with low BMD (T-score<-2.5) had the highest adjusted fracture risk (RR=9.1; 95%CI 3.6-23). Elevating hsCRP from quartiles 1-3 into the highest quartile was equivalent to increasing the fracture risk normally associated with osteopenia to that of osteoporosis. A similar pattern was observed for BMD measured at the spine. Circulating hsCRP is an independent predictor of fracture risk in postmenopausal women. These results may implicate systemic inflammation as a factor in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis. hsCRP may be a useful assay to predict fracture risk in conjunction with BMD.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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