Themes and trends in Australian and New Zealand tourism research: A social network analysis of citations in two leading journals (1994-2007)

Benckendorff, Pierre (2009) Themes and trends in Australian and New Zealand tourism research: A social network analysis of citations in two leading journals (1994-2007). Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, 16 1: 1-15. doi:10.1375/jhtm.16.1.1

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Author Benckendorff, Pierre
Title Themes and trends in Australian and New Zealand tourism research: A social network analysis of citations in two leading journals (1994-2007)
Journal name Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1447-6770
Publication date 2009-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1375/jhtm.16.1.1
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 16
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Place of publication Bowen Hills, Qld., Australia
Publisher Australian Academic Press
Language eng
Subject 1409 Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
Abstract Assessments and rankings of the contribution and influence of scholars, institutions and journals in tourism are becoming increasingly common. This article extends the existing literature by providing a finer grained understanding of key influences in tourism research. This study presents a bibliometric analysis of the tourism literature by examining papers authored by Australian and New Zealand researchers in Annals of Tourism Research and Tourism Management between 1994 and 2007. A general picture of the field is drawn by examining keywords, the most-cited authors and works, as well as co-citation patterns. The analysis is extended by the use of social network analysis to explore the links between keywords and influential works in the field. The article also addresses the conference theme by identifying emerging themes and influences. Results indicate that tourism research in Australia and New Zealand has been strongly influenced by sociology and anthropology, geography and behavioural psychology. Emerging themes have focused on the health and safety of tourists, risk, wine tourism and segmentation.
Formatted abstract
Assessments and rankings of the contribution and influence of scholars, institutions and journals in tourism are becoming increasingly common. This article extends the existing literature by providing a finer grained understanding of key influences in tourism research. This study presents a bibliometric analysis of the tourism literature by examining papers authored by Australian and New Zealand researchers in Annals of Tourism Research and Tourism Management between 1994 and 2007. A general picture of the field is drawn by examining keywords, the most-cited authors and works, as well as co-citation patterns. The analysis is extended by the use of social network analysis to explore the links between keywords and influential works in the field. The article also addresses the conference theme by identifying emerging themes and influences. Results indicate that tourism research in Australia and New Zealand has been strongly influenced by sociology and anthropology, geography and behavioural psychology. Emerging themes have focused on the health and safety of tourists, risk, wine tourism and segmentation.
Keyword Bibliometrics
Social network analysis
Australia
New Zealand
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: UQ Business School Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 28 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 30 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 04 May 2011, 20:31:13 EST by Dr Pierre Benckendorff on behalf of School of Tourism