Angry responses to emotional events: The role of impaired control and drive in people with severe traumatic brain injury

McDonald, Skye, Hunt, Christopher, Henry, Julie D., Dimoska, Aneta and Bornhofen, Cristina (2010) Angry responses to emotional events: The role of impaired control and drive in people with severe traumatic brain injury. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 32 8: 855-864. doi:10.1080/13803391003596405


Author McDonald, Skye
Hunt, Christopher
Henry, Julie D.
Dimoska, Aneta
Bornhofen, Cristina
Title Angry responses to emotional events: The role of impaired control and drive in people with severe traumatic brain injury
Journal name Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-8634
1380-3395
1744-411X
Publication date 2010-10-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13803391003596405
Volume 32
Issue 8
Start page 855
End page 864
Total pages 10
Place of publication Sussex, U.K.
Publisher Psychology Press
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Emotional and behavioral changes (e.g., irritability and anger or alternatively passivity and inertia) are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). These changes have been conceptualized as reflecting a loss of regulation, specifically control (loss of inhibition) and/or drive (self-initiation). However, no empirical studies have examined the relationship between neuropsychological measures of these constructs and emotional responsivity in situ. In this study, 29 individuals with severe, chronic TBI and 32 matched control participants were shown emotionally evocative films selected to elicit anger and were asked to rate their emotions before and after. They were also given measures of executive function to assess inhibition and flexibility as indices of control and drive, respectively. Both groups had heightened anxiety after the films. An increase in anger and confusion correlated with impaired control (Haylings Test score, Trails B errors) in the TBI group but not in controls. No association was found between reduced emotional responsivity and drive (Controlled Oral Word Association Test, Matrix Reasoning Scaled Score, Trails A/B time difference). This study provides support for the use of formal measures of disinhibition on neuropsychological tests as a corollary for emotion disinhibition. As with previous work, operationalization of loss of drive was more difficult to achieve.
© 2010 Psychology Press.
Keyword Control
Drive
Emotion
Frontal lobes
Traumatic brain injury
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 21 Apr 2011, 00:45:53 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology