Theory of mind following traumatic brain injury: The role of emotion recognition and executive dysfunction

Henry, Julie D., Phillips, Louise H., Crawford, John R., Iestwaart, Magdalena and Summers, Fiona (2006) Theory of mind following traumatic brain injury: The role of emotion recognition and executive dysfunction. Neuropsychologia, 44 10: 1623-1628. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2006.03.020


Author Henry, Julie D.
Phillips, Louise H.
Crawford, John R.
Iestwaart, Magdalena
Summers, Fiona
Title Theory of mind following traumatic brain injury: The role of emotion recognition and executive dysfunction
Journal name Neuropsychologia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0028-3932
1873-3514
Publication date 2006-01-01
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2006.03.020
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 44
Issue 10
Start page 1623
End page 1628
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Formatted abstract
A number of studies have now documented that traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with deficits in the recognition of basic emotions, the capacity to infer mental states of others (theory of mind), as well as executive functioning. However, no study to date has investigated the relationship between these three constructs in the context of TBI. In the current study TBI participants (N= 16) were compared with demographically matched healthy controls (N= 17). It was found that TBI participants’ recognition of basic emotions, as well as their capacity for mental state attribution, was significantly reduced relative to controls. Performance on both of these measures was strongly correlated in the healthy control, but not in the TBI sample. In contrast, in the TBI (but not the control) sample, theory of mind was substantially correlated with performance on phonemic fluency, a measure of executive functioning considered to impose particular demands upon cognitive flexibility and self-regulation. These results are consistent with other evidence indicating that deficits in some aspects of executive functioning may at least partially underlie deficits in social cognition following TBI, and thus help explain the prevalence of social dysfunction in TBI.
Keyword Head injury
Social cognition
Executive function
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 19 Apr 2011, 18:37:46 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology