Exploring speech-language pathologists' perspectives about living successfully with aphasia

Brown, Kyla, Worrall, Linda, Davidson, Bronwyn and Howe, Tami (2011) Exploring speech-language pathologists' perspectives about living successfully with aphasia. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 46 3: 300-311. doi:10.3109/13682822.2010.496762


Author Brown, Kyla
Worrall, Linda
Davidson, Bronwyn
Howe, Tami
Title Exploring speech-language pathologists' perspectives about living successfully with aphasia
Journal name International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1368-2822
1460-6984
Publication date 2011-05-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/13682822.2010.496762
Volume 46
Issue 3
Start page 300
End page 311
Total pages 12
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:
Exploring the concept of living successfully with aphasia challenges researchers and clinicians to identify positive rather than negative adaptive processes and factors that may inform clinical interventions and other community-based services for people with aphasia. Previous research on this topic has focused on the perspectives of individuals with aphasia, and identified a number of core components of living successfully with aphasia, including doing things, meaningful relationships, striving for a positive way of living, and communication. As service providers, speech–language pathologists may also contribute valuable insights regarding components of living successfully with aphasia and factors influencing individuals’ abilities to achieve this goal.

Aims:
This research aimed to explore speech–language pathologists’ perspectives about the meaning of living successfully with aphasia, and factors they perceive to influence individuals’ abilities to live successfully with aphasia.

Methods & Procedures:
Twenty-five speech–language pathologists from around Australia participated in semi-structured in-depth interviews on the topic of living successfully with aphasia. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis to identify themes of relevance.

Outcomes & Results:
Through the analysis of speech–language pathologist participant transcripts, the following themes emerged as components of living successfully with aphasia: participation and community engagement; communication; meaningful relationships; autonomy or independence; acceptance and embracement of aphasia; self-esteem; happiness; and purpose or meaningfulness. A wide variety of factors were perceived to influence individuals’ abilities to live successfully with aphasia. These included support, acceptance, and understanding; personal factors; and speech–language pathology services.

Conclusions & Implications:

Further research is required to extend findings by investigating how speech–language pathologists address identified themes in clinical practice. To improve service provision, continued reflection by speech–language pathologists on how services provided align with client's values and priorities is a necessity. A commitment by speech–language pathologists to work in partnership with people with aphasia and their families and friends to achieve successful living with aphasia is one way to translate this research into practice.
Copyright © 2010 Informa Plc. All rights reserved.


Keyword Aphasia
Qualitative
Speech and language therapists
Quality of life
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Posted online on August 18, 2010.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 25 Mar 2011, 21:43:49 EST by Professor Linda Worrall on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences