Practice patterns for predicted difficult airway management and access to airway equipment by anaesthetists in Queensland, Australia

Zugai, B. M., Eley, V., Mallitt, K. A. and Greenland, K. B. (2010) Practice patterns for predicted difficult airway management and access to airway equipment by anaesthetists in Queensland, Australia. Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, 38 1: 27-32.

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Author Zugai, B. M.
Eley, V.
Mallitt, K. A.
Greenland, K. B.
Title Practice patterns for predicted difficult airway management and access to airway equipment by anaesthetists in Queensland, Australia
Journal name Anaesthesia and Intensive Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0310-057X
1448-0271
Publication date 2010-01-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 38
Issue 1
Start page 27
End page 32
Total pages 6
Editor Neville M. Gibbs
Place of publication Edgecliff, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australian Society of Anaesthetists
Language eng
Formatted abstract
A postal survey was conducted to investigate difficult airway management, training and equipment availability among Fellows of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists in Queensland. The survey aimed to determine practise patterns for predicted difficult airways and investigate equipment availability.

Participants were asked to nominate an induction method, intubation method and airway adjunct for each of the five difficult airway scenarios. The cases consisted of one elective and four emergency scenarios. Availability of difficult airway devices in their institution was also assessed, as well as demographics of practice and airway-related maintenance of professional standards participation.

There were 454 surveys distributed and 250 returned (response rate 55%). Direct laryngoscopy and flexible fibreoptic intubation were the most commonly selected techniques for all five cases. Difficult intubation trolleys were available to 98% of responders. Certain types of equipment (such as fibreoptic bronchoscopes and cricothyroidotomy kits) were available less frequently in private institutions. We recommend a standardisation of difficult airway management equipment and an on-going training program to provide support for anaesthetists in all locations.
Keyword Intubation
Intratracheal
Instrumentation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 22 Mar 2011, 07:25:15 EST by Sia Athanasas on behalf of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care - RBWH