Spelling Bug: Benefits of using adaptive technology for training spelling in primary school classrooms

Boden, Marie, Viller, Stephen and Dole, Shelley (2010). Spelling Bug: Benefits of using adaptive technology for training spelling in primary school classrooms. In: Stephen Viller and Ben Kraal, OZCHI '10 Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group of Australia on Computer-Human Interaction. 22nd Conference of the Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group of Australia on Computer-Human Interaction (OZCHI 2010), Brisbane, Australia, (336-339). November 22-26, 2010. doi:10.1145/1952222.1952295

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Author Boden, Marie
Viller, Stephen
Dole, Shelley
Title of paper Spelling Bug: Benefits of using adaptive technology for training spelling in primary school classrooms
Conference name 22nd Conference of the Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group of Australia on Computer-Human Interaction (OZCHI 2010)
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates November 22-26, 2010
Proceedings title OZCHI '10 Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group of Australia on Computer-Human Interaction
Journal name ACM International Conference Proceeding Series
Place of Publication New York , United States
Publisher ACM Press
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1145/1952222.1952295
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
ISBN 9781450305020
Editor Stephen Viller
Ben Kraal
Start page 336
End page 339
Total pages 4
Language eng
Abstract/Summary We have developed, used and evaluated Spelling Bug, a computer program designed for teachers and students in primary school classrooms, in three schools in Brisbane over 1.5 years. We evaluated how learner-adaptive computer programs can be successfully integrated in primary classrooms in situ, using observations, interviews and computer-based data logs. The study found participating teachers felt time poor and they did not priorities learning to use new technologies. However, if they find add-on value they use the technology to complement traditional teaching. The response to using Spelling Bug was positive from both teachers and students. Students enjoyed a new task for working with spelling and they responded positively to the individual challenge the computer program set up for them. Teachers were pleased to find their students working independently and found time to support individual needs in the classroom. Retrieving information from a computer program gave support for teachers when making decisions on how to proceed with their teaching and presenting to parents.
Keyword Learner-adaptive
Classroom technology
Education
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sat, 12 Mar 2011, 02:29:30 EST by Dr Stephen Viller on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering