Relative contributions of light interception and radiation use efficiency to the reduction of maize productivity under cold temperatures

Louarn, Gaëtan, Chenu, Karine, Fournier, Christian, Andrieu, Bruno and Giauffret, Catherine (2008) Relative contributions of light interception and radiation use efficiency to the reduction of maize productivity under cold temperatures. Functional Plant Biology, 35 9-10: 885-899. doi:10.1071/FP08061

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Author Louarn, Gaëtan
Chenu, Karine
Fournier, Christian
Andrieu, Bruno
Giauffret, Catherine
Title Relative contributions of light interception and radiation use efficiency to the reduction of maize productivity under cold temperatures
Journal name Functional Plant Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1445-4408
1445-4416
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/FP08061
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 35
Issue 9-10
Start page 885
End page 899
Total pages 14
Place of publication Collingwood, VIC, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Maize (Zea mays L.) is a chill-susceptible crop cultivated in northern latitude environments. The detrimental effects of cold on growth and photosynthetic activity have long been established. However, a general overview of how important these processes are with respect to the reduction of productivity reported in the field is still lacking. In this study, a model-assisted approach was used to dissect variations in productivity under suboptimal temperatures and quantify the relative contributions of light interception (PARc) and radiation use efficiency (RUE) from emergence to flowering. A combination of architectural and light transfer models was used to calculate light interception in three field experiments with two cold-tolerant lines and at two sowing dates. Model assessment confirmed that the approach was suitable to infer light interception. Biomass production was strongly affected by early sowings. RUE was identified as the main cause of biomass reduction during cold events. Furthermore, PARc explained most of the variability observed at flowering, its relative contributions being more or less important according to the climate experienced. Cold temperatures resulted in lower PARc, mainly because final leaf length and width were significantly reduced for all leaves emerging after the first cold occurrence. These results confirm that virtual plants can be useful as fine phenotyping tools. A scheme of action of cold on leaf expansion, light interception and radiation use efficiency is discussed with a view towards helping breeders define relevant selection criteria.
Keyword Architecture
Chilling stress
Elite inbreds
Light transfer model
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Special Issue: "Functional–Structural Plant Modelling". 29 papers selected from those presented at FSPM07: "This paper originates from a presentation at the 5th International Workshop on Functional–Structural Plant Models, Napier, New Zealand, November 2007." This paper is a substantial reworking of "Gaetan Louarn, Karine Chenu, Christian Fournier, Bruno Andrieu, Catherine Giauffret. Dissecting maize matter production variability using a structural model - An original approach to drive maize breeding for cold tolerance" presented during Session 3: Photosynthesis.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
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Created: Tue, 08 Mar 2011, 00:50:07 EST