Evaluation of antibacterial activity of Australian basidiomycetous macrofungi using a high-throughput 96-well plate assay

Neeraj, Bala, Aitken, Elizabeth A. B., Fechner, Nigel, Cusack, Andrew and Steadman, Kathryn (2011) Evaluation of antibacterial activity of Australian basidiomycetous macrofungi using a high-throughput 96-well plate assay. Pharmaceutical Biology, 49 5: 492-500. doi:10.3109/13880209.2010.526616

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Author Neeraj, Bala
Aitken, Elizabeth A. B.
Fechner, Nigel
Cusack, Andrew
Steadman, Kathryn
Title Evaluation of antibacterial activity of Australian basidiomycetous macrofungi using a high-throughput 96-well plate assay
Journal name Pharmaceutical Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1388-0209
1744-5116
Publication date 2011-05-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/13880209.2010.526616
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 49
Issue 5
Start page 492
End page 500
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Language eng
Subject 1313 Molecular Medicine
3004 Pharmacology
3003 Pharmaceutical Science
3002 Drug Discovery
2707 Complementary and alternative medicine
Abstract Context: The production of antimicrobial compounds by macrofungi is not unexpected because they have to compete with other organisms for survival in their natural hostile environment. Previous studies have indicated that macrofungi contain secondary metabolites with a range of pharmacological activities including antimicrobial agents.
Formatted abstract
Context: The production of antimicrobial compounds by macrofungi is not unexpected because they have to compete with other organisms for survival in their natural hostile environment. Previous studies have indicated that macrofungi contain secondary metabolites with a range of pharmacological activities including antimicrobial agents.
Objective: To investigate macrofungi for antimicrobial activity due to the increasing need for new antimicrobials as a result of resistance in the bacterial community to existing treatments.
Materials and methods: Forty-seven different specimens of macrofungi were collected across Queensland, Australia. Freeze-dried fruiting bodies were sequentially extracted with three solvents: water, ethanol, and hexane. These extracts were tested against representative Gram+ve, Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-ve, Escherichia coli bacteria.
Results and discussion: Overall water and ethanol extracts were more effective against S. aureus than E. coli, whereas a small number of hexane extracts showed better results for their antimicrobial potential against E. coli at higher concentrations only. Encouraging results were found for a number of macrofungi in the genera Agaricus (Agaricaceae), Amanita (Amanitaceae), Boletus (Boletaceae), Cantharellus (Cantharellaceae), Fomitopsis (Fomitopsidaceae), Hohenbuehelia (Pleurotaceae), Lentinus (Polyporaceae), Ramaria (Gomphaceae), and Strobilomyces (Boletaceae) showing good growth inhibition of the pathogens tested.
Conclusion: The present study establishes the antimicrobial potential of a sample of Australian macrofungi that can serve as potential candidates for the development of new antibiotics.
© 2011 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.
Keyword Fungi
Antibacterial
Water extracts
96-well plate assay
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 17 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 07 Mar 2011, 21:31:51 EST by Charna Kovacevic on behalf of School of Pharmacy