The natural host range shift and subsequent evolution of canine parvovirus resulted from a virus-specific binding to canine transferrin receptor

Hueffer, Karsten, Parker, John S. L., Weichert, Wendy S., Geisel, Rachel E., Sgro, Jean-Yves and Parrish, Colin R. (2003) The natural host range shift and subsequent evolution of canine parvovirus resulted from a virus-specific binding to canine transferrin receptor. Journal of Virology, 77 3: 1718-1726. doi:10.1128/JVI.77.3.1718-1726.2003


Author Hueffer, Karsten
Parker, John S. L.
Weichert, Wendy S.
Geisel, Rachel E.
Sgro, Jean-Yves
Parrish, Colin R.
Title The natural host range shift and subsequent evolution of canine parvovirus resulted from a virus-specific binding to canine transferrin receptor
Journal name Journal of Virology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-538X
1098-5514
Publication date 2003-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1128/JVI.77.3.1718-1726.2003
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 77
Issue 3
Start page 1718
End page 1726
Total pages 9
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Language eng
Abstract Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a host range variant of a feline virus that acquired the ability to infect dogs through changes in its capsid protein. Canine and feline viruses both use the feline transferrin receptor (TfR) to infect feline cells, and here we show that CPV infects canine cells through its ability to specifically bind the canine TfR. Receptor binding on host cells at 37°C only partially correlated with the host ranges of the viruses, and an intermediate virus strain (CPV type 2) bound to higher levels on cells than did either the feline panleukopenia virus or a later strain of CPV. During the process of adaptation to dogs the later variant strain of CPV gained the ability to more efficiently use the canine TfR for infection and also showed reduced binding to feline and canine cells compared to CPV type 2. Differences on the top and the side of the threefold spike of the capsid surface controlled specific TfR binding and the efficiency of binding to feline and canine cells, and these differences also determined the cell infection properties of the viruses.
Keyword Cell adhesion
Feline panleukopenia virus
Host range
Molecular evolution
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 04 Mar 2011, 02:24:47 EST by Dr Rachel Allavena on behalf of School of Veterinary Science