Does race or socioeconomic status predict adverse outcome after out of hospital cardiac arrest: A multi-center study

Sayegh, Anthony J., Swor, Robert, Chu, Kevin H., Jackson, Raymond, Gitlin, Josh, Domeier, Robert M., Basse, Eliezer, Smith, Dena and Fales, William (1999) Does race or socioeconomic status predict adverse outcome after out of hospital cardiac arrest: A multi-center study. Resuscitation, 40 3: 141-146. doi:10.1016/S0300-9572(99)00026-X


Author Sayegh, Anthony J.
Swor, Robert
Chu, Kevin H.
Jackson, Raymond
Gitlin, Josh
Domeier, Robert M.
Basse, Eliezer
Smith, Dena
Fales, William
Title Does race or socioeconomic status predict adverse outcome after out of hospital cardiac arrest: A multi-center study
Journal name Resuscitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0300-9572
1873-1570
Publication date 1999-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0300-9572(99)00026-X
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 40
Issue 3
Start page 141
End page 146
Total pages 5
Place of publication E. Park, Shannon, Co. Clare, Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Language eng
Abstract frailty is proposed as a summative measure of health status and marker of individual vulnerability. We aimed to investigate the discriminative capacity of a frailty index (FI) derived from interRAI Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment for Acute Care (AC) in relation to multiple adverse inpatient outcomes.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To assess whether socioeconomic status (SES) or race is associated with adverse outcome after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).

Methods: A convenience sample of OHCA of presumed cardiac origin from seven suburban cities in Michigan, 1991–1996. Median household income (HHI), utilizing patient home address and 1990 census tract data, was dichotomized above and below 1990 state median income. Patient race was dichotomized as black or white. Outcome was defined as survival to hospital discharge (DC). Multiple logistic regression and Pearson’s χ2 values were used for analysis.

Results: Of 1317 cases with complete data for analysis, the average age was 67.3±16.0, 939 (71.1%) were white, 587 (44.4%) arrests were witnessed (WIT), and 65 (4.9%) were DC alive. There was no significant difference between races with respect to WIT arrests, VT/VF arrest rhythms, and a small difference in EMS response interval. Whites were more likely to be above median HHI (57.1 vs. 26.2%, P<0.001). Adjusted odds ratios for predictors of survival were WIT arrest (OR=3.76, 95% CI (1.7, 8.2)), VT/VF (OR=8.74, 95% CI (3.7, 10.8), but not race (OR=0.68, 95% CI (0.3, 1.4)) or SES (OR=1.51,95% CI 0.8, 2.8).

Conclusion: In this population, neither race nor SES was independently associated with a worse outcome after OHCA.
© 1999 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Cardiac arrest
CPR
Emergency medical services
Outcome
Socioeconomic status
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Mar 2011, 01:39:00 EST by Dr Kevin Chu on behalf of Royal Brisbane Clinical School