Cultural value and viscerality in Sukiyaki Western Django: Towards a phenomenology of bad film

Stadler, Jane (2010) Cultural value and viscerality in Sukiyaki Western Django: Towards a phenomenology of bad film. Continuum, 24 5: 679-691. doi:10.1080/10304312.2010.505334

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Author Stadler, Jane
Title Cultural value and viscerality in Sukiyaki Western Django: Towards a phenomenology of bad film
Formatted title
Cultural value and viscerality in Sukiyaki Western Django: Towards a phenomenology of bad film
Journal name Continuum   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1030-4312
1469-3666
Publication date 2010-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10304312.2010.505334
Open Access Status
Volume 24
Issue 5
Start page 679
End page 691
Total pages 13
Place of publication Murdoch, Western Australia
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Language eng
Abstract Cult film director Takashi Miike's hybrid homage Sukiyaki Western Django (2007) can be critiqued in terms of its derivative nature, its overstated affect, and its lack of psychological and thematic nuance - characteristics that are associated with 'bad film' genres such as the spaghetti western that Miike emulates and valorizes. The classification of texts as 'bad film' is often related to their exaggerated affective qualities and the cultural devaluation of emotion and bodily sensation by comparison with aesthetic and intellectual engagement. This article analyses Sukiyaki Western Django in terms of a phenomenology of affect, contending that the film deploys a kinetic, visceral cinematic aesthetic that is central to its meaning and to the relationship between the audience and the screen. The phenomenological method is used to level hierarchies of value, reappraise conceptions of bad film, and strip back the ingrained presuppositions of film theory. I argue that by bracketing traditional ways of understanding, phenomenology prompts a reassessment of how we make sense of cinema and a revaluation of the embodied role of the spectator.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 02 Mar 2011, 00:42:16 EST by Dr Jane Stadler on behalf of School of Communication and Arts