Evidence for crossvergence in the perception of task and contextual performance: A study of Western expatriates working in Thailand

Fisher, Gregory B. and Härtel, Charmine E. J. (2004) Evidence for crossvergence in the perception of task and contextual performance: A study of Western expatriates working in Thailand. Cross Cultural Management, 11 2: 3-15. doi:10.1108/13527600410797765


Author Fisher, Gregory B.
Härtel, Charmine E. J.
Title Evidence for crossvergence in the perception of task and contextual performance: A study of Western expatriates working in Thailand
Journal name Cross Cultural Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1352-7606
1758-6089
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1108/13527600410797765
Volume 11
Issue 2
Start page 3
End page 15
Total pages 13
Place of publication Bingley, W. Yorks., United Kingdom
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Language eng
Abstract The applicability of the Western model of task and contextual performance to the context of Thai and Western managers, professionals and consultants working together in Thailand is addressed in this research. The results show a clear difference in the factor structure of how Western and Thai managers perceive the importance of performance factors. Moreover, the task and contextual factor structure found for Western managers working in a Western culture did not hold for Westerners working within the Thai cultural environment. These findings provide evidence of adaptation by the Westerner to the Thai cultural environment, supporting the notion of crossvergence.
Keyword Cultural diversity
Performance factors
Thailand
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 28 Feb 2011, 05:07:07 EST by Professor Charmine Hartel on behalf of UQ Business School