Transitional tastes: Teen girls and genre in the critical reception of Twilight

Bode, Lisa (2010) Transitional tastes: Teen girls and genre in the critical reception of Twilight. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, 24 5: 707-719. doi:10.1080/10304312.2010.505327

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Author Bode, Lisa
Title Transitional tastes: Teen girls and genre in the critical reception of Twilight
Formatted title
Transitional tastes: Teen girls and genre in the critical reception of Twilight
Journal name Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1030-4312
1469-3666
ISBN 9780415679268
0415679265
Publication date 2010-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10304312.2010.505327
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 24
Issue 5
Start page 707
End page 719
Total pages 13
Place of publication Murdoch, WA, Australia
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Language eng
Subject 1213 Visual Arts and Performing Arts
3316 Cultural Studies
Abstract Reviews of Twilight (2008), Catherine Hardwicke's enormously popular screen adaptation of Stephenie Meyer's teen vampire romance novel, reveal a focus on both the gender and age of the film's audience. The teen, tween or adolescent girl, her tastes and affective response, are evoked in different ways by many reviewers to denigrate the film. However, the adolescent girl is also used in positive reviews to legitimate Twilight and its pleasures. This article asks: what can the adolescent girl, her different connotations, and the ways reviewers position themselves in relation to this figure, reveal about Twilight's cultural resonance, and the ongoing dynamics of distinction in the contemporary cultural field more broadly?
Formatted abstract
Reviews of Twilight (2008), Catherine Hardwicke's enormously popular screen adaptation of Stephenie Meyer's teen vampire romance novel, reveal a focus on both the gender and age of the film's audience. The teen, tween or adolescent girl, her tastes and affective response, are evoked in different ways by many reviewers to denigrate the film. However, the adolescent girl is also used in positive reviews to legitimate Twilight and its pleasures. This article asks: what can the adolescent girl, her different connotations, and the ways reviewers position themselves in relation to this figure, reveal about Twilight's cultural resonance, and the ongoing dynamics of distinction in the contemporary cultural field more broadly?
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Special Issue: "After taste: Cultural value and the moving image". Published as a stand-alone hardcover under that title 16th September 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 11 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 21 Feb 2011, 22:58:22 EST by Dr Lisa Bode on behalf of School of Communication and Arts