Ethnography considered useful: Situating criticality

Morrison, Ann, Viller, Stephen and Mitchell, Peta (2010). Ethnography considered useful: Situating criticality. In: OZCHI '10: Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Australian Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group. 22nd Annual Conference of the Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group (CHISIG) of Australia on Computer-Human Interaction, Brisbane, Australia, (184-187). 22 - 26 November 2010. doi:10.1145/1952222.1952261

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Author Morrison, Ann
Viller, Stephen
Mitchell, Peta
Title of paper Ethnography considered useful: Situating criticality
Conference name 22nd Annual Conference of the Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group (CHISIG) of Australia on Computer-Human Interaction
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 22 - 26 November 2010
Proceedings title OZCHI '10: Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Australian Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group
Journal name ACM International Conference Proceeding Series
Place of Publication New York, United States
Publisher ACM Digital Library
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1145/1952222.1952261
ISBN 9781450305020
Start page 184
End page 187
Total pages 4
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Increasingly the fields of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and art are intersecting. Interactive artworks are being evaluated by HCI methods and artworks are being created that employ and repurpose technology for interactive environments. In this paper we steer a path between empirical and critical–theoretical traditions, and discuss HCI research and art works that also span this divide. We address concerns about ‘new’ ethnography raised by Crabtree et al. (2009) in “Ethnography Considered Harmful”, a critical essay that positions ethnographic and critical-theoretical views at odds with each other. We propose a mediated view for understanding interactions within open-ended interactive artworks that values both perspectives as we navigate boundaries between art practice and HCI.
Keyword Situated action
Open-ended
Ethnography
Interactive art
Ethnomethodology
HCI
Interaction Design
Installation art
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 18 Feb 2011, 22:09:40 EST by Ms Stormy Wehi on behalf of School of Communication and Arts