Motor timing and the preparation for sequential actions

Bortoletto, Marta, Cook, Alana and Cunnington, Ross (2011) Motor timing and the preparation for sequential actions. Brain and Cognition, 75 2: 196-204. doi:10.1016/j.bandc.2010.11.016


Author Bortoletto, Marta
Cook, Alana
Cunnington, Ross
Title Motor timing and the preparation for sequential actions
Journal name Brain and Cognition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-2626
1090-2147
Publication date 2011-03-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.bandc.2010.11.016
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 75
Issue 2
Start page 196
End page 204
Total pages 9
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Subject 2805 Cognitive Neuroscience
3205 Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
3206 Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
Abstract Motor timing is essential for performing self-initiated movement sequences. Here, we investigated how sequence rhythm, or the timing for co-ordinating movements within a sequence, contributes to action preparation, compared with other processes occurring during sequence planning. First, we recorded the readiness potential (RP) in a condition of complex sequence rhythm and in condition of high demand on the timing for sequence initiation. We found that sequence rhythm and sequence initiation are independent processes, with sequence initiation contributing to early RP. Second, we compared the RP recorded in a condition of complex sequence rhythm and in a condition of complex sequence order, in which a complex combination of finger sub-movements had to be correctly ordered within a sequence. We found that sequence rhythm and sequence order share common processes occurring late RP. We suggest that the preparation for movement involves independent processes devoted to different aspects of motor timing and sequencing.
Formatted abstract
Motor timing is essential for performing self-initiated movement sequences. Here, we investigated how sequence rhythm, or the timing for co-ordinating movements within a sequence, contributes to action preparation, compared with other processes occurring during sequence planning. First, we recorded the readiness potential (RP) in a condition of complex sequence rhythm and in condition of high demand on the timing for sequence initiation. We found that sequence rhythm and sequence initiation are independent processes, with sequence initiation contributing to early RP. Second, we compared the RP recorded in a condition of complex sequence rhythm and in a condition of complex sequence order, in which a complex combination of finger sub-movements had to be correctly ordered within a sequence. We found that sequence rhythm and sequence order share common processes occurring late RP. We suggest that the preparation for movement involves independent processes devoted to different aspects of motor timing and sequencing.
© 2010 Elsevier Inc.
Keyword Electroencephalography
Motor preparation
Motor timing
Movement complexity
Rhythm
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 28 December 2010.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 18 Feb 2011, 00:34:38 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute