Complementary and alternative medicine in rural communities: Current research and future directions

Wardle, Jon, Lui, Chi-Wai and Adams, Jon (2012) Complementary and alternative medicine in rural communities: Current research and future directions. The Journal of Rural Health, 28 1: 101-112. doi:10.1111/j.1748-0361.2010.00348.x

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Author Wardle, Jon
Lui, Chi-Wai
Adams, Jon
Title Complementary and alternative medicine in rural communities: Current research and future directions
Journal name The Journal of Rural Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0890-765X
1748-0361
Publication date 2012-01-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1748-0361.2010.00348.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 28
Issue 1
Start page 101
End page 112
Total pages 12
Place of publication Burlington, MA, U.S.A.
Publisher Blackwell
Language eng
Subject 2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract Contexts: The consumption of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in rural areas is a significant contemporary health care issue. An understanding of CAM use in rural health can provide a new perspective on health beliefs and practice as well as on some of the core service delivery issues facing rural health care generally. Purpose: This article presents the first review and synthesis of research findings on CAM use and practice in rural communities. Methods: A comprehensive search of literature from 1998 to 2010 in CINAHL, MEDLINE, AMED, and CSA Illumina (social sciences) was conducted. The search was confined to peer-reviewed articles published in English reporting empirical research findings on the use or practice of CAM in rural settings. Findings: Research findings are grouped and examined according to 3 key themes: "prevalence of CAM use and practice,""user profile and trends of CAM consumption," and "potential drivers and barriers to CAM use and practice." Conclusions: Evidence from recent research illustrates the substantial prevalence and complexity of CAM use in rural regions. A number of potential gaps in our understanding of CAM use and practice in rural settings are also identified.
Formatted abstract
Contexts:
The consumption of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in rural areas is a significant contemporary health care issue. An understanding of CAM use in rural health can provide a new perspective on health beliefs and practice as well as on some of the core service delivery issues facing rural health care generally.

Purpose:
This article presents the first review and synthesis of research findings on CAM use and practice in rural communities.

Methods:
A comprehensive search of literature from 1998 to 2010 in CINAHL, MEDLINE, AMED, and CSA Illumina (social sciences) was conducted. The search was confined to peer-reviewed articles published in English reporting empirical research findings on the use or practice of CAM in rural settings.

Findings:
Research findings are grouped and examined according to 3 key themes: “prevalence of CAM use and practice,”“user profile and trends of CAM consumption,” and “potential drivers and barriers to CAM use and practice.”

Conclusions:
Evidence from recent research illustrates the substantial prevalence and complexity of CAM use in rural regions. A number of potential gaps in our understanding of CAM use and practice in rural settings are also identified.
Keyword Allied health
Alternative medicine
Health services research
Rural
Utilization of health services
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 15 NOV 2010

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 43 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 11 Feb 2011, 02:00:06 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health