Dramatizing war: George Packer and the democratic potential of verbatim theater

Chou, Mark and Bleiker, Roland (2010) Dramatizing war: George Packer and the democratic potential of verbatim theater. New Political Science, 32 4: 561-574. doi:10.1080/07393148.2010.520441


Author Chou, Mark
Bleiker, Roland
Title Dramatizing war: George Packer and the democratic potential of verbatim theater
Journal name New Political Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0739-3148
1469-9931
Publication date 2010-12-04
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/07393148.2010.520441
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 32
Issue 4
Start page 561
End page 574
Total pages 14
Place of publication Cambridge, MA, U.S.A.
Publisher Carfax
Language eng
Abstract Times of war are often times when democratic debates are under siege. The apparent necessity to ward off an enemy and secure the nation's survival can trigger a state of exception: a partial suspension of crucial democratic rights and practices for the sake of national security. The purpose of this essay is to examine the potential and limits of theater to offer an alternative forum for public debate in contexts where freedom of speech is limited. To do so, the authors systematically analyze the content and context of one play: George Packer's 2008 award-winning play, Betrayed. Through their analysis, they make two key arguments about the democratic potential of theater. First, that theater has the potential to sidestep political censorship during a time of war. And second, that theater can give voice to a multitude of real characters and under-represented perspectives.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 02 Feb 2011, 02:25:04 EST by Elmari Louise Whyte on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies