Self-rated health status in an urban indigenous primary care setting: Implications for clinicians and public health policy

Spurling, Geoffrey and Hayman, Noel (2010) Self-rated health status in an urban indigenous primary care setting: Implications for clinicians and public health policy. Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 6: 598-601. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00627.x

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Author Spurling, Geoffrey
Hayman, Noel
Title Self-rated health status in an urban indigenous primary care setting: Implications for clinicians and public health policy
Journal name Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2010-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00627.x
Volume 34
Issue 6
Start page 598
End page 601
Total pages 4
Place of publication Richmond, Vic, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Self-rated health status provides insights into the health beliefs of a population. This will be important for framing public health messages in the context of the need to 'close the gap' for Australian Indigenous people. Our primary objectives were to describe the self-rated health status of Indigenous people attending the Inala Indigenous Health service, identify associations with positive and negative self-rated health status and identify targets for public health awareness raising activity.

Methods: Using a convenience sample, we approached all Indigenous patients attending the Inala Indigenous Health Service for an Indigenous adult health check between June 2007 and July 2008. From Indigenous adult health check data we analysed self-rated health status and chronic disease risk factors.

Results: Out of a possible 509, 413 patients were recruited (response rate 81%). The number of participants who rated their health as fair or poor was 47%. The association of greatest magnitude and statistical significance with Indigenous patients' self rated health status (negative versus positive) was waist circumference followed by smoking, depression and age. Chronic disease risk factors not associated with self-rated health status included systolic blood pressure, harmful alcohol use, marijuana use, presence of diabetes and lack of exercise.

Conclusions: High rates of negative self-rated health status were found. Public health awareness-raising for Indigenous audiences should consider targeting chronic disease risk factors such as systolic blood pressure, harmful alcohol use, marijuana use, presence of diabetes and lack of exercise.  © 2010 The Authors.
Keyword Health status
Primary healthcare
Indigenous health service
Oceanic ancestry group
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 09 Jan 2011, 10:11:08 EST