Maintenance of physical activity and dietary change following a telephone-delivered intervention

Eakin, Elizabeth, Reeves, Marina, Winkler, Elisabeth, Lawler, Sheleigh and Owen, Neville (2010) Maintenance of physical activity and dietary change following a telephone-delivered intervention. Health Psychology, 29 6: 566-573. doi:10.1037/a0021359

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Author Eakin, Elizabeth
Reeves, Marina
Winkler, Elisabeth
Lawler, Sheleigh
Owen, Neville
Title Maintenance of physical activity and dietary change following a telephone-delivered intervention
Journal name Health Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-6133
Publication date 2010-11-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0021359
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 29
Issue 6
Start page 566
End page 573
Total pages 8
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Abstract Objective: To examine the maintenance of behavioral changes 6 months following a telephone-delivered physical activity and diet intervention. Design: Patients (n = 434) with Type 2 diabetes or hypertension were recruited from 10 primary care practices in a disadvantaged community; practices were randomized to a telephone-counseling intervention (TC; 5 practices, n = 228) or usual care (UC; 5 practices, n = 206). Main Outcome Measures: Validated, self-report measures of physical activity and diet were taken at baseline, 12 months (end-of-intervention), and 18 months (6 months postintervention completion). Results: For physical activity, the significant (p < .001) within-groups improvements from baseline observed at 12 months remained at 18 months, in both the TC (62.2 +/- 14.2 minutes/week; 2.2 +/- 0.3 sessions/week) and UC (74.7 +/- 14.9 minutes/week; 2.1 +/- 0.4 sessions/week) groups. For all dietary outcomes, significant (p < .05) between-groups maintenance effects, similar to end-of-intervention outcomes, remained [TC-UC changes from baseline to 18 months (95% CI)]: total fat [-1.33(-2.16, -0.50)% energy/day], saturated fat [-1.06 (-1.70, -0.43)% energy/day], fiber intake [1.90 (0.72, 3.15) grams/day], and fruit [0.22 (0.05, 0.40) servings/day]), except vegetables [0.59 (-0.01, 1.17) servings/day; p = .05]. Intervention effects across all health behavior outcomes were stronger for the subgroup (n = 145) adhering to the study protocol. Conclusion: Telephone-delivered interventions can promote maintenance of health behavior change. Studies with longer-term follow-up are needed, particularly to determine how intervention duration and intensity might further enhance maintenance.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To examine the maintenance of behavioral changes 6 months following a telephone-delivered physical activity and diet intervention. Design: Patients (n = 434) with Type 2 diabetes or hypertension were recruited from 10 primary care practices in a disadvantaged community; practices were randomized to a telephone-counseling intervention (TC; 5 practices, n = 228) or usual care (UC; 5 practices, n = 206).
Main Outcome Measures: Validated, self-report measures of physical activity and diet were taken at baseline, 12 months (end-of-intervention), and 18 months (6 months postintervention completion).
Results: For physical activity, the significant (p < .001) within-groups improvements from baseline observed at 12 months remained at 18 months, in both the TC (62.2 ± 14.2 minutes/week; 2.2 ± 0.3 sessions/week) and UC (74.7 ± 14.9 minutes/week; 2.1 ± 0.4 sessions/week) groups. For all dietary outcomes, significant (p < .05) between-groups maintenance effects, similar to end-of-intervention outcomes, remained [TC-UC changes from baseline to 18 months (95% CI)]: total fat [-1.33(-2.16, -0.50)% energy/day], saturated fat [-1.06 (-1.70, -0.43)% energy/day], fiber intake [1.90 (0.72, 3.15) grams/day], and fruit [0.22 (0.05, 0.40) servings/day]), except vegetables [0.59 (-0.01, 1.17) servings/day; p = .05]. Intervention effects across all health behavior outcomes were stronger for the subgroup (n = 145) adhering to the study protocol.
Conclusion: Telephone-delivered interventions can promote maintenance of health behavior change. Studies with longer-term follow-up are needed, particularly to determine how intervention duration and intensity might further enhance maintenance.
© 2010 American Psychological Association.
Keyword Type 2 diabetes
Hypertension
Telephone counseling
Primary care
Behavior change
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 290519
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 02 Jan 2011, 10:15:53 EST