Glucose consumption decreases impulsive aggression in response to provocation in aggressive individuals

Denson, Thomas F., von Hippel, William, Kemp, Richard I. and Teo, Lydia S. (2010) Glucose consumption decreases impulsive aggression in response to provocation in aggressive individuals. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46 6: 1023-1028. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2010.05.023


Author Denson, Thomas F.
von Hippel, William
Kemp, Richard I.
Teo, Lydia S.
Title Glucose consumption decreases impulsive aggression in response to provocation in aggressive individuals
Journal name Journal of Experimental Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-1031
1096-0465
Publication date 2010-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jesp.2010.05.023
Volume 46
Issue 6
Start page 1023
End page 1028
Total pages 6
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Abstract Impaired executive control is implicated in aggression. Research suggests that the acute administration of glucose can improve executive control. In two experiments undergraduates completed a measure of trait aggression and consumed a glucose or placebo beverage before being given the chance to administer a blast of white noise to a fictitious participant. In Experiment 1, all participants were provoked and mentally depleted or not. Glucose was most effective in reducing aggression for those high in trait aggression even when depleted. In Experiment 2, participants were provoked or not. When provoked, glucose reduced aggression among those high in trait aggression. However, when not provoked, glucose increased aggression among those high in trait aggression. These data suggest that the acute administration of glucose can be beneficial in reducing aggression in response to provocation among those high in trait aggression. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
Keyword Aggression
Aggressive personality
Glucose
Executive control
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published under Reports

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 26 Dec 2010, 10:04:27 EST